Identifying and Preventing Warping from Water Damage in Paintings in Santa Barbara, Thousand Oaks, Los Angeles, and Orange County

Are you noticing a slight curve or bend in your oil or acrylic paintings? Perhaps the frame seems slightly warped? Don’t overlook these signs, as they could indicate underlying issues that require attention. In this article, we’ll delve into how to identify warping from water damage in paintings and frames, focusing on potential causes prevalent in areas like Santa Barbara, Thousand Oaks, Los Angeles, and Orange County, which have experienced heavy rainfall recently.

Identifying Warping:

Warping from water damage in paintings can manifest in various ways, from slight distortions in the canvas or panel to noticeable bends in the frame. When examining your artwork, look for any irregularities in its shape or surface. Place the painting on a flat surface and observe if it lays completely flat or if there are areas where it lifts or curves upwards. Additionally, inspect the frame for any signs of bending or warping along its edges or corners.

This painting exhibits warping from water damage, as well as flaking and discoloration

This painting exhibits warping from water damage, as well as flaking and discoloration

Potential Causes of Warping:

Warping from water damage in paintings is a common issue that art collectors face. The recent heavy rainfall in areas like Santa Barbara, Thousand Oaks, Los Angeles, and Orange County can exacerbate this issue. When water seeps into the painting’s support structure, whether it’s canvas or wood panel, it can cause expansion and distortion. This expansion puts pressure on the paint layers, leading to warping over time. In frames, moisture absorption can cause the wood to swell and warp, affecting the overall shape and stability.

Preventing Warping:

To prevent warping from water damage in paintings, it’s essential to protect your artwork from humidity, especially in regions prone to heavy winter rainfall like Santa Barbara, Thousand Oaks, Los Angeles, and Orange County. Ensure proper storage in a controlled environment with stable humidity levels. Avoid hanging paintings in areas exposed to moisture, such as basements or near windows. Additionally, invest in quality framing materials that are resistant to warping and moisture damage. Improper storage can lead to a host of problems in your paintings, including water damage.

The warping on this painting is being relaxed with an art conservator's hot table.

The warping in this painting is being relaxed with an art conservator’s hot table.

Consulting a Conservator:

If you suspect warping from water damage in your paintings, it’s crucial to consult with an experienced art conservator. They can assess the extent of the damage and recommend appropriate conservation measures. Fine Art Conservation Laboratories’ conservators service the Santa Barbara, Thousand Oaks, Los Angeles, and Orange County areas and are well-versed in addressing water-related issues in artworks. Don’t hesitate to seek professional guidance to preserve the beauty and integrity of your precious pieces; unaddressed water damage can contribute to further deterioration of your precious artwork.

old american painting that is flaking

Warping from water damage is one of the many issues that this painting faces

By understanding how to identify warping and addressing potential causes like water damage, you can protect your oil and acrylic paintings from deterioration. Stay vigilant, especially in times of inclement weather, and consult with a conservator for expert advice tailored to your artwork’s needs.

Do you need help navigating the insurance claim process?

Fine Art Conservation Laboratories’ 45 years of expertise in preserving and restoring art offers invaluable help and practical knowledge for helping people through the insurance claim process for damaged collectibles and art pieces. Our experienced team understands the complexities of insurance claims related to art, heirlooms, and antiques, providing reports that are properly prepared with information that the insurance company never puts in doubt. Fine Art Conservation Laboratories charges flat fees for this work, not a percentage of the claim settlement, and our expertise is honored nationwide. Let us help make the art, heirloom, and collectible part of the insurance claim process as seamless as possible and preserve your peace of mind.

Do you have questions about water damage on acrylic and oil paintings? Please call 805-564-3438 or email flora.faclofficemanager@gmail.com.

This blog post has been syndicated at ExpertClick.com.

What does it mean that this article is “ syndicated”?
It’s a bit of a coup to get an article syndicated, and its certainly prestigious, as additional “proof” that the info and the author are considered far and wide authoritative and an expert in the field. So, enjoy and trust our content!! This article was syndicated for USA national redistribution.
When something is published, usually by a news source, and is made available through different venues for redistribution then it is said to be syndicated. Publications that are syndicated are usually considered of value as being from an expert, educational, new worthy or valuable for wide popular interest. See syndication page at the renowned publicity site: https://www.expertclick.com/NRWire/
This website’s syndication included:
1) Included in the ExpertClick Press Room as a ‘press release.’ (different than a ‘news release’)
2) Included in the ‘Speaker Bureau Platform Page.’
3) Shown on the front page of ExpertClick, in rotation with other most recent posts.
4) Shown in the ‘News Release Results page.’
5) Included on optimized for searches on all my topics of expertise.
6) Shown via RSS linked from the Press Room. (A specific way news is actively distributed within the industry)
7) Shown in the full RSS feed from ExpertClick. (Another, different specific way news is actively distributed within the industry)
8) Syndicated to LexisNexis.com As of 2006, the company had the world’s largest electronic database for legal and public-records related information, distributor of academic content and expert opinion.
This article has been syndicated at https://www.expertclick.com/NRWire/

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What to Do About Flaking on Oil or Acrylic Paintings

Have you noticed developing flaking on oil or acrylic paintings in your collection? If so, don’t worry! Your paintings are not doomed. Flaking is a common issue that art owners may encounter, particularly with paintings done in oil or acrylic. It’s a distressing sight to see paint coming off the surface, but understanding the potential causes of flaking and how to prevent it is crucial for preserving the integrity of your cherished artworks.

flaking paint on a mural

In addition flaking on oil and acrylic paintings, murals can also suffer this type of damage.

Causes of Flaking on Oil or Acrylic Paintings

Flaking on oil or acrylic paintings occurs when the bond between the layers of paint and the surface they’re applied to breaks down. There are several potential causes for this phenomenon:

  1. Poor Adhesion: One of the primary reasons for flaking on oil or acrylic paint is poor adhesion between the paint layers and the surface they’re painted on. This can happen if the surface wasn’t adequately prepared before painting or if the wrong type of primer was used. Without a strong bond, the paint can easily peel away from the surface over time.
  2. Moisture Damage: Exposure to excessive moisture or humidity is another common cause of flaking and other problems. When moisture seeps into the layers of paint, it can weaken the bond between them and the underlying surface. This is particularly problematic for paintings done on canvas, as the fabric is more susceptible to moisture damage than other surfaces.
  3. Temperature Fluctuations: Extreme changes in temperature can also contribute to flaking on oil or acrylic paintings. When the materials in a painting expand and contract due to fluctuations in temperature, it puts stress on the paint layers. Over time, this stress can cause the paint to crack and eventually flake off.
  4. Mechanical Damage: Physical impacts or abrasions can weaken the paint layers and cause them to flake off. This can happen during handling, transportation, or if the painting comes into contact with a rough surface.
two family heirloom portraits are pictured. The one on the left depicting a Victorian woman has flaking running across the sitter's face. The portrait of a man on the right needs to be cleaned of grime and other signs of weathering.

Two family heirloom portraits are pictured. The one on the left depicting a Victorian woman has flaking running across the sitter’s face. The portrait of a man on the right needs to be cleaned of grime and other signs of weathering.

Preventing Flaking on Oil or Acrylic Paintings:

Preventing flaking requires proactive measures to protect the integrity of the paint layers and the surface they’re applied to:

  1. Proper Storage: Store paintings in a controlled environment with stable temperature and humidity levels. Avoid hanging them in areas prone to moisture, such as basements, bathrooms, or near windows. Many collectors opt to store artwork that is not on display in professional art storage facilities.
  2. Gentle Handling: Handle paintings with care, avoiding excessive pressure or touching the painted surface directly. Use protective coverings during transportation and storage to prevent physical damage.
  3. Regular Inspection: Periodically inspect your paintings for any signs of flaking or deterioration. Early detection allows for prompt action to prevent further damage. If you notice any flaking or other issues, consult with an art conservator for professional advice.

Consulting an Art Conservator:

If you encounter flaking on your oil or acrylic paintings, it’s essential to seek guidance from an experienced art conservator. They have the expertise to assess the extent of the damage and recommend appropriate conservation treatments.

When discussing flaking with a conservator, provide details about the painting’s history, current condition, and any noticeable changes. Clear communication ensures the conservator understands the unique needs of your artwork and can provide tailored solutions to address flaking issues.

By understanding the potential causes of flaking and taking proactive measures to prevent it, you can protect your paintings and preserve them for future generations to enjoy.

In summary, flaking is a common issue that can affect paintings done in oil or acrylic. By understanding the causes of flaking and taking preventive measures, you can safeguard your cherished artworks and ensure their longevity. If you encounter flaking on your paintings, consult with an art conservator for professional guidance and conservation treatments tailored to your artwork’s specific needs.

a female art conservator applies a treatment to a mural that is laid out on a table

Julia Betancor working on WPA murals at Fine Art Conservation Laboratories with Scott M. Haskins

Do you have questions about flaking on oil or acrylic paintings? Call 805-564-3438 or text at 805-570-4140 or email at flora.faclofficemanager@gmail.com

Do you need help navigating the insurance claim process for artwork?

Fine Art Conservation Laboratories’ 45 years of expertise in preserving and restoring art offers invaluable help and practical knowledge for helping people through the insurance claim process for damaged collectibles and art pieces. Our experienced team understands the complexities of insurance claims related to art, heirlooms, and antiques, providing reports that are properly prepared with information that the insurance company never puts in doubt. Fine Art Conservation Laboratories charges flat fees for this work, not a percentage of the claim settlement, and our expertise is honored nationwide. Let us help make the art, heirloom, and collectible part of the insurance claim process as seamless as possible and preserve your peace of mind.

This blog post has been syndicated at ExpertClick.com.

What does it mean that this article is “ syndicated”?
It’s a bit of a coup to get an article syndicated, and its certainly prestigious, as additional “proof” that the info and the author are considered far and wide authoritative and an expert in the field. So, enjoy and trust our content!! This article was syndicated for USA national redistribution.
When something is published, usually by a news source, and is made available through different venues for redistribution then it is said to be syndicated. Publications that are syndicated are usually considered of value as being from an expert, educational, new worthy or valuable for wide popular interest. See syndication page at the renowned publicity site: https://www.expertclick.com/NRWire/
This website’s syndication included:
1) Included in the ExpertClick Press Room as a ‘press release.’ (different than a ‘news release’)
2) Included in the ‘Speaker Bureau Platform Page.’
3) Shown on the front page of ExpertClick, in rotation with other most recent posts.
4) Shown in the ‘News Release Results page.’
5) Included on optimized for searches on all my topics of expertise.
6) Shown via RSS linked from the Press Room. (A specific way news is actively distributed within the industry)
7) Shown in the full RSS feed from ExpertClick. (Another, different specific way news is actively distributed within the industry)
8) Syndicated to LexisNexis.com As of 2006, the company had the world’s largest electronic database for legal and public-records related information, distributor of academic content and expert opinion.
This article has been syndicated at https://www.expertclick.com/NRWire/

Posted in Art Storage and Transport, Painting on canvas, Water Damage | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Identifying and Preventing Water Damage on Paintings in Rainy Santa Barbara and Los Angeles

Has the rainy weather in the Santa Barbara and Los Angeles areas left you with water damage on paintings? Do you see signs of mold, flaking, blistering, discoloration, or warping on your artwork? Don’t fret! This article is for you.

Rainy weather might be great for the environment, but it unfortunately might put artworks at risk. Understanding how to spot and prevent water damage on paintings and other artworks is crucial for art collectors. Water damage on paintings is often subtle, and early detection is the key to preserving your valuable pieces. Here’s a guide to help you navigate the potential risks, protect your art, and engage with art conservation professionals.

Water damage on paintings and murals

Here’s an example of water damage on paintings: stains, vast areas of fogged or bloomed varnish and crystallization of varnish resin.

Spotting Water Damage:

Water damage to paintings can manifest in various ways, from discoloration and warping to mold growth. Keep a keen eye on any changes in the paint surface, such as flaking or blistering, as these may indicate exposure to moisture. Discoloration, often appearing as yellow or brown stains, is another sign of water damage. Check the back of the artwork for signs of mold, which thrives in damp conditions. If you notice any of these signs, it’s time to take action and consult with an art conservation professional.

Preventing Water Damage:

Prevention starts with proper storage and display. Ensure your artworks are not in direct contact with walls, and keep them away from windows and doors where water can seep in. Since the Los Angeles, Santa Barbara, and other areas in Souther California are receiving a lot of rain recently, it’s important to maintain stable humidity levels in your art storage space, as fluctuations can contribute to water damage. During rainy seasons, consider using dehumidifiers and inspecting your storage area for leaks. Regularly check the condition of your roof and windows to prevent water intrusion.

image of an HVAC system. Climate control is very important for preventing water damage on paintings

Climate control is very important for preventing water damage on paintings

Engaging with Art Conservation Professionals:

If you suspect that you have water damage on paintings or other artworks, consult with an art conservation professional promptly. Keep in mind that every art conservation/ restoration project is different, so an expert is needed to determine the appropriate treatments for your artwork. They have the expertise to assess the extent of the damage and recommend appropriate restoration measures. When reaching out to a conservator, provide detailed information about the artwork, including its dimensions, history, current condition, and any noticeable changes. Clear communication ensures the conservator understands the unique needs of your artwork.

art conservator inpainting repaired area of water stains on a a painting

Professional art conservators have the expertise to mitigate the effects of water damage on paintings and other artworks

Tip Summary:

  • Water Damage Identification: Learn to recognize signs of water damage on paintings like discoloration, warping, and mold growth.
  • Preventive Measures: Protect your art by ensuring proper storage, stable humidity levels, and regular maintenance.
  • Consulting Conservators: Engage with art conservation professionals promptly for expert assessment and restoration.

Has the water already gotten to your artwork? Fine Art Conservation Laboratories can help with your insurance claim! 

Fine Art Conservation Laboratories’ 45 years of expertise in preserving and restoring art offers invaluable help and practical knowledge for helping people through the insurance claim process for damaged collectibles and art pieces. Our experienced team understands the complexities of insurance claims related to art, heirlooms, and antiques, providing reports that are properly prepared with information that the insurance company never puts in doubt. Fine Art Conservation Laboratories charges flat fees for this work, not a percentage of the claim settlement, and our expertise is honored nationwide. Let us help make the art, heirloom, and collectible part of the insurance claim process as seamless as possible and preserve your peace of mind. See this article for a couple short stories about art owners’ journey with insurance claim and fire/ water damage. Please call 805-564-3438 if you have questions or would like to schedule a consultation with our expert art conservators. 

This blog post has been syndicated at ExpertClick.com. What does it mean that this article is “ syndicated”?

It’s a bit of a coup to get an article syndicated, and its certainly prestigious, as additional “proof” that the info and the author are considered far and wide authoritative and an expert in the field. So, enjoy and trust our content!! This article was syndicated for USA national redistribution.

When something is published, usually by a news source, and is made available through different venues for redistribution then it is said to be syndicated. Publications that are syndicated are usually considered of value as being from an expert, educational, new worthy or valuable for wide popular interest. See syndication page at the renowned publicity site: https://www.expertclick.com/NRWire/

This website’s syndication included:

1) Included in the ExpertClick Press Room as a ‘press release.’ (different than a ‘news release’)

2) Included in the ‘Speaker Bureau Platform Page.’

3) Shown on the front page of ExpertClick, in rotation with other most recent posts.

4) Shown in the ‘News Release Results page.’

5) Included on optimized for searches on all my topics of expertise.

6) Shown via RSS linked from the Press Room. (A specific way news is actively distributed within the industry)

7) Shown in the full RSS feed from ExpertClick. (Another, different specific way news is actively distributed within the industry)

8) Syndicated to LexisNexis.com As of 2006, the company had the world’s largest electronic database for legal and public-records related information, distributor of academic content and expert opinion.

This article has been syndicated at https://www.expertclick.com/NRWire/

 

Posted in Art Storage and Transport, Painting on canvas, Water Damage | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

What is my Collectible Worth? What is the opinion of an expert worth?

This blog post has been syndicated at https://www.expertclick.com/NRWire/Releasedetails.aspx?id=302112
What does it mean that this article is “ syndicated”? See end of article for explanation.BTW, that is not a cigarette in my hand, lol. I don’t smoke. Its for measuring the pH of paper.

What is your collectible worth? OK, time for a teaching moment regarding several lessons. On this project and with this client, I consulted with her (a valuable service) on what her purposes or objectives were with the artwork (she wants to sell it)… but there was a ripple in the paper. Her opinion is that it should bring about $50,000 at auction but she can’t see getting the best price with the warp in the paper. I told her that I would have to take it out of its plexiglass frame in order to determine what the problem is. That seemed OK as she was also open to putting a new frame on it since this old plexiglass box frame was coming apart at the seams. I picked up the artwork at her house (valuable service).

When I took the artwork out of the frame at our lab, I found out that ripples in the paper would occur because the artwork was not mounted down to a solid support or a backing board. In other words, it was in virgin condition as the artist provided it to the art gallery. The artist and the art gallery had also decided on the framing which was designed, specific, and was kind of cool. Just the same, I got an estimate to have a new plexiglass box frame made, and I could not find anyone who would do it exactly like the old frame, nor with the more robust materials of the old frame. I also found out that a new cheaper quality frame, which was not as stylish, would cost quite a bit of money.

So, over the phone, I consulted again with the client about the value of letting me repair the original frame, and to not mount the artwork to remove ripples, because with the artwork in original vintage, virgin condition, and the original vintage frame, as chosen by the artist and the gallery, that this combination would make it highly desirable at auction, and might even result in a premium or higher price because of its completely original nature. so I fixed the plexiglass box frame and reinstalled the artwork, unmounted with ripples back into the frame. Then we hand delivered it back to the residence of the owner, here was her response…

I reminded her over the phone that we had gone over these details as they came up, and that every step along the way we had made decisions that would be to her advantage with the resale of the artwork. While I am not an appraiser, I told her, mounting the artwork to a board to remove the ripples and not using the original frame could have impacted the sale at auction by at least 50% less.… which was only a guess.

Her response? “I am not going to believe that ripples or distortions occur in paper just because the weather changes! What do you think I am, stupid?” And then she hung up on me.

Well, there’s no answer to that last question that’s going to calm her down or change her mind so…

But if her estimate of $50,000 is truly the amount that this artwork could bring at auction, then I may have saved her $15-$20,000 reduction in the sales price.  There are lots of reasons why something sells for more or less at an auction, but very often the condition of the artwork is a factor that can cause the auction sales to be exciting… or to fall flat.

I think I’ll end this lesson right here… otherwise…

Questions about your artwork’s maintenance, framing, care, restoration, shipping, display, storage, etc? Call Scott M. Haskins or Virginia Panizzon at 805 564 3438

Article Syndication

Article Syndication Graphic.jpg

This blog post has been syndicated at ExpertClick.com What does it mean that this article is “ syndicated”?

Its a bit of a coup to get an article syndicated, and its certainly prestigious, as additional “proof” that the info and the author are considered far and wide authoritative and an expert in the field. So, enjoy and trust our content!! This article was syndicated for USA national redistribution.

When something is published, usually by a news source, and is made available through different venues for redistribution then it is said to be syndicated. Publications that are syndicated are usually considered of value as being from an expert, educational, new worthy or valuable for wide popular interest. See syndication page at the renowned publicity site: https://www.expertclick.com/https://www.expertclick.com/NRWire/Releasedetails.aspx?id=302112

This website’s syndication included:

1) Included in the ExpertClick Press Room as a ‘press release.’ (different than a ‘news release’)

2) Included in the ‘Speaker Bureau Platform Page.’

3) Shown on the front page of ExpertClick, in rotation with other most recent posts.

4) Shown in the ‘News Release Results page.’

5) Included on optimized for searches on all my topics of expertise.

6) Shown via RSS linked from the Press Room. (A specific way news is actively distributed within the industry)

7) Shown in the full RSS feed from ExpertClick. (Another, different specific way news is actively distributed within the industry)

8) Syndicated to LexisNexis.com As of 2006, the company had the world’s largest electronic database for legal and public-records related information, distributor of academic content and expert opinion.

This article has been syndicated at https://www.expertclick.com/NRWire/Releasedetails.aspx?id=302112

 

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Mastering the Art of Collection: Expert Tips for Collectors on Art Insurance and Preservation

Art you new to art collecting? Have you recently inherited an estate? Art you a seasoned art collector looking to further protect your collection? This article is for you!

Delving into the world of art insurance and collection is a journey that transcends mere acquisition—it’s about creating and safeguarding a legacy. For art enthusiasts keen on gathering insights into effective art collection, preservation, and art insurance strategies, this guide offers valuable tips to ensure your prized artworks stand the test of time.

a white man looks into a microscope to evaluate a painting's condition for an art insurance claim

FACL’s head art conservator, Scott M. Haskins, evaluates the condition of an heirloom painting

Nurturing Your Art Collection

Art collection is an art in itself. Beyond the joy of acquiring pieces, it involves the responsibility of preserving and protecting your artistic treasures. Embrace these proactive strategies to nurture and safeguard your art collection for years to come.

Fusion of Preservation and Estate Planning

Preserving your art legacy involves more than aesthetic considerations; it’s an integral part of estate planning. By seamlessly integrating preservation practices into your estate plan, you ensure a smooth transition of your art treasures to future generations. Engage with seasoned appraisers and art conservation experts to weave conservation into your broader estate planning narrative.

Decoding Art Insurance for Collectors

Understanding the intricacies of art insurance policies is a crucial aspect of being an art enthusiast. Dive into the nuances of scheduled rider coverage, differentiate between depreciable and appreciable contents, and grasp the implications of replacement cost versus market value. Regularly reviewing your insurance appraisals with experts keeps you abreast of market trends, ensuring your collection is adequately protected.

three people in lab coats evaluate and treat a large statue of a seated Buddha for an art insurance claim

Get any type of artwork insured. From paintings to sculptures, protection of your valuables is invaluable!

Do you need further guidance about insurance claims for art? FACL has got you covered

Fine Art Conservation Laboratories’ 45 years of expertise in preserving and restoring art offers invaluable help and practical knowledge for helping people through the insurance claim process for damaged collectibles and art pieces. Our experienced team understands the complexities of art insurance claims related to art, heirlooms, and antiques, providing reports that are properly prepared with information that the insurance company never puts in doubt. Fine Art Conservation Laboratories charges flat fees for this work, not a percentage of the claim settlement, and our insurance expertise is appreciated nationwide. Let us help make the art, heirloom, and collectible part of the insurance claim process as seamless as possible and preserve your peace of mind. 

Strategic Art Donations as a Philanthropic Endeavor

Art enthusiasts can extend their passion beyond personal enjoyment through strategic art donations. While the act of giving is noble, navigating the current landscape, marked by an oversupply of donated items, requires a savvy approach. Leverage local networks, explore online sharing platforms, and collaborate with organizations in need to optimize the positive impact of your philanthropic endeavors.

Crafting a Lasting Legacy Through Art Provenance

The stories behind each artwork, encapsulated in provenance, add a layer of richness to your collection. Provenance is the recorded journey of an artwork from its origin through its owners to the present day. Those in the art industry use this information to provide more context for a work. An object’s story might include a famous collector or a period when it was part of a larger collection. Documenting these narratives through professional photography and video tours not only immortalizes the essence of each piece but also serves as a valuable asset for heirs, estate planning, and art insurance considerations.

a man and a woman examine a vase with a magnifying glass for art insurance claims

Provenance is an important factor that contributes to the value of an art piece

Key Takeaways for Art Enthusiasts

  1. Proactive Preservation: Embrace ongoing preservation practices to proactively safeguard your art collection.

 

  1. Seamless Estate Integration: Include art preservation into your estate plan for a smooth transition to future generations.

 

  1. Insurance Savvy: Understand insurance intricacies, regularly reviewing policies to align with the market value of your art collection.

 

  1. Philanthropic Impact: Explore strategic donation avenues, leveraging local networks and online platforms for a meaningful philanthropic impact.

 

  1. Documented Provenance: Create a documented provenance archive through professional mediums, serving both sentimental and practical purposes.

 

Mastering the art of collection involves a harmonious blend of preservation, insurance savvy, and strategic philanthropy. By adopting these expert tips, art enthusiasts enhance their personal enjoyment of their collection and contribute to a broader narrative of cultural preservation.

To learn more about painting and mural conservation as well as our provided services, visit the FACL website!

This blog post has been syndicated at ExpertClick.com. What does it mean that this article is “ syndicated”?

It’s a bit of a coup to get an article syndicated, and its certainly prestigious, as additional “proof” that the info and the author are considered far and wide authoritative and an expert in the field. So, enjoy and trust our content!! This article was syndicated for USA national redistribution.

When something is published, usually by a news source, and is made available through different venues for redistribution then it is said to be syndicated. Publications that are syndicated are usually considered of value as being from an expert, educational, new worthy or valuable for wide popular interest. See syndication page at the renowned publicity site: https://www.expertclick.com/NRWire/

This website’s syndication included:

1) Included in the ExpertClick Press Room as a ‘press release.’ (different than a ‘news release’)

2) Included in the ‘Speaker Bureau Platform Page.’

3) Shown on the front page of ExpertClick, in rotation with other most recent posts.

4) Shown in the ‘News Release Results page.’

5) Included on optimized for searches on all my topics of expertise.

6) Shown via RSS linked from the Press Room. (A specific way news is actively distributed within the industry)

7) Shown in the full RSS feed from ExpertClick. (Another, different specific way news is actively distributed within the industry)

8) Syndicated to LexisNexis.com As of 2006, the company had the world’s largest electronic database for legal and public-records related information, distributor of academic content and expert opinion.

This article has been syndicated at https://www.expertclick.com/NRWire/

 

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“The Spirit of Catalina” A Masterpiece Mural by Roger Dolin Protected with MuralGuard

This blog post has been syndicated at ExpertClick.com. What does it mean that this article is “ syndicated”? See end of article for explanation.

When planning a public art project, the process should include looking into the future to predict what may be needed to protect and maintain it. Such was the foresight of mural artist Roger Dolin and art patron, Jack Tucey when they planned a new monumental mural 16′ x 75′ in the city of Avalon on the Island of Catalina in California. Jack entitled it “The Spirit of Catalina”… Roger entitled it “Independence Day Parade 2016 Avalon, Catalina” lol… The new mural covers the entire exterior wall down to the asphalt of the parking lot and is accessible by the public 24/7. And even though there is not a big problem of graffiti in Avalon, the concern was protection against vandals and also the protection against the weather (the ocean is 1 block away).

It is indeed a masterpiece and those of the neighborhood feel a strong “pride of ownership” which will hopefully be the motivation for controlling the effects of vandalism, which has been the case of another mural on Balboa Island in Newport Beach that is now going on 15 years in an equally accessible location and is still nice and clean and the pride of the neighborhood. See this mention in the article: https://www.fineartconservationlab.com/murals/public-art-murals-graffiti-protection-coating-our-multi-layer-applications-is-put-to-the-test/

The monumental mural in Avalon, Catalina Island (off the coast of Los Angeles, California) is the largest public art in the city and the masterpiece of a lifetime by mural artist, Roger Dolin. Its extraordinary and entertaining because of the colors and actions of the Independence Day Parade – Avalon, Catalina Island with 4 life-sized Clydesdales pulling their Budweiser beer wagon, the performance of the USC Marching Band, local personalities and townsfolk peppered throughout among the plentiful patriotic flags, banners, clowns and blow-up-air-filled-fun-figures and general hoopla! The mural was completed this week… yesterday… Nov. 9th.

Not only was special attention given to the planning and layout of the subject matter by the artist and the patrons, local business-couple Jack and Nora Tucey, but the intention is to have this public art last for generations. For this reason, artist Roger Dolin brought on board as his consultant, Scott M Haskins, Art and Mural Conservator who has decades of experience analyzing and treating murals that fall apart. Dolin’s painting technique involved painting the composition in his studio on 4’ x 8’ sections of polyester fabric with acrylic paint. Then the painted sections were assembled on the mural’s wall, like a puzzle, with an acrylic gel medium and the joins or seams of the edges of the sections were painted out to give the mural a continuous appearance. A final varnish was applied as a protective coating.

Haskins, and his company Fine Art Conservation Laboratories, are renown for their consultation contracts that guide artists and city governments in ways they can protect murals and other public art from vandalism and ensure that they will age better, holding together longer for future generations. Presently some of those entities include the city of Los Angeles, the City of Santa Monica, the City of Indio and the State of Washington. Click here for more info.

This is not Roger Dolin’s and Scott Haskins’ his first rodeo! Both are experienced veterans with hundreds of murals to their credit. Besides the construction of the mural, Haskins has worked with Dolin in the past by helping to apply protective coatings on his murals to protect them against weather related damage, ensure the eventual removal of graffiti easier, safer for the mural and more efficient and more economical.

The mural’s protective coating on this mural is MuralGuard, formulated and analyzed with consultation of the mural conservation profession. Artificial aging tests stressed the coating for over 20 years before they turned the equipment off as they saw no changes in the stability, color/clarity, or appearance of the material. Since that period of testing, the company has continued to make improvements in the product. It is classified as a non-sacrificial protective coating and comes in matt, semi-gloss and glossy. Independence Day Parade, a 16’ x 72’ mural was coated with 4 layers/coatings of the glossy finish in order to transmit the best color, depth of field, best contrast in the composition and the best level of protection.

Scott Haskins in the foreground… Roger is in the scissor lift.

You can call  Roger Dolin’s mobile is 818 635 5273

Questions? Scott M. Haskins

805 570 4140 faclartdoc@gmail.com

Address of the mural location: 112 Clarissa Ave, Avalon Bay, Catalina Island.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-ZX_TEI5mvs  Anheiserbush video

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=deraNb0zj0A

https://fb.watch/ofRcXDXSdM/ ( local TV)

Here are links to posts from MuralGuard. 

IG: https://www.instagram.com/reel/Czgv0Z1MpzK/

FB: https://fb.watch/oftQBkr6xr/?mibextid=qC1gEa

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/posts/rainguard-brands_rainguardpro-muralguard-avalon-activity-7129136245053521920-Sf73?utm_source=share&utm_medium=member_ios

Article Syndication Graphic.jpg

This blog post has been syndicated at ExpertClick.com. What does it mean that this article is “ syndicated”?

Its a bit of a coup to get an article syndicated, and its certainly prestigious, as additional “proof” that the info and the author are considered far and wide authoritative and an expert in the field. So, enjoy and trust our content!! This article was syndicated for USA national redistribution.

When something is published, usually by a news source, and is made available through different venues for redistribution then it is said to be syndicated. Publications that are syndicated are usually considered of value as being from an expert, educational, new worthy or valuable for wide popular interest. See syndication page at the renowned publicity site: https://www.expertclick.com/NRWire/Releasedetails.aspx?id=301584

This website’s syndication included:

1) Included in the ExpertClick Press Room as a ‘press release.’ (different than a ‘news release’)

2) Included in the ‘Speaker Bureau Platform Page.’

3) Shown on the front page of ExpertClick, in rotation with other most recent posts.

4) Shown in the ‘News Release Results page.’

5) Included on optimized for searches on all my topics of expertise.

6) Shown via RSS linked from the Press Room. (A specific way news is actively distributed within the industry)

7) Shown in the full RSS feed from ExpertClick. (Another, different specific way news is actively distributed within the industry)

8) Syndicated to LexisNexis.com As of 2006, the company had the world’s largest electronic database for legal and public-records related information, distributor of academic content and expert opinion.

This article has been syndicated at https://www.expertclick.com/NRWire/Releasedetails.aspx?id=300056

Posted in FACL in the media, Murals, Saving Public Art | Tagged | Leave a comment

An Art Conservator’s Step-by-Step Guide on How to Hang a Painting

Do you know how to hang a painting? It’s okay if you don’t – I see paintings that have been damaged or are on the verge of falling off of their hanging hardware all the time. Here’s an art conservator’s guide for hanging paintings. 

In my role as an art conservator, I frequently encounter paintings in my lab that have suffered damage because someone did not know how to hang a painting. Even when I’m doing my home-consultations, I too-often see paintings that are about to fall off their hooks or whose wires are about the fray apart. Knowing how to properly hang paintings is critical in preserving the artwork. Whether you’re a seasoned art enthusiast or a new collector, understanding the best practices behind displaying and safeguarding your paintings is crucial for their long-term well-being.

Post-Holiday Considerations:

two family heirloom portraits are pictured. The one on the left depicting a Victorian woman has flaking running across the sitter's face. The portrait of a man on the right needs to be cleaned of grime and other signs of weathering. People often wonder how to hang a painting that they have been gifted.

two family heirloom portraits are pictured. The one on the left depicting a Victorian woman has flaking running across the sitter’s face. The portrait of a man on the right needs to be cleaned of grime and other signs of weathering.

Given the holiday season, many individuals receive paintings as heartfelt gifts. If you find yourself with new acquisitions, follow these guidelines promptly to learn how to hang a painting and integrate your artwork seamlessly into your collection, maintaining their longevity.

  1. Hanging Considerations:

When it comes to hanging paintings, it’s essential to prioritize the safety of the artwork. Avoid hanging pieces in direct sunlight or areas with extreme temperature and humidity fluctuations, as these can lead to fading, warping, and cracking. Choose a location away from vents, fireplaces, or other sources of heat, as sudden temperature changes can adversely affect the paint and canvas.

Art conservator, Virginia Panizzon, cleaning smoke damage off of a landscape painting. Knowing how to hang a painting properly can help avoid a situation like this.

The smoke damage on this painting is a result of incorrect placement above a fireplace. It is important to know where and how to hang a painting to avoid this type of damage.

  1. Mounting and Framing:

Selecting the right frame and matting materials is a critical aspect of proper hanging. Opt for acid-free, archival materials to prevent chemical reactions that could harm the artwork over time. Ensure that the frame adequately supports the weight of the painting and that whoever assists you knows how to hang a painting.

two men carrying a large painting with an ornate frame around it. It's important to pick a frame that can support the painting's weight and shape.

It is important to choose a frame that fits snugly that can support your painting’s weight

 

  1. Hanging Hardware:
3 differently sized d-rings that are often used for hainging paintings.

Quality wire attachment hardware for framed items

Invest in high-quality hanging hardware designed for the weight and size of your painting. Use D-rings and sturdy picture wire for a secure and evenly distributed support system. Check the hardware periodically to ensure it remains in good condition, preventing accidental falls and damage. For more info about hanging hardware, click here!

  1. Proper Spacing:

Allow sufficient spacing between paintings to prevent accidental collisions and promote proper air circulation. This helps maintain consistent environmental conditions around each artwork, reducing the risk of mold growth and other environmental damage.

  1. Storage Guidelines:

For paintings not currently on display, proper storage is equally crucial. Choose a dark, climate-controlled space with controlled temperature and humidity levels. Avoid storing paintings in basements, attics, or garages, as these areas are susceptible to temperature extremes and fluctuations. Here’s a guide for choosing the right storage facility for your artwork.

Mural removal in Austin Texas

Removal of two 30ft murals from a medical center in Austin Texas. Our Professional Art Conservation Team moves every piece carefully and securely

  1. Protective Coverings:

When not displayed, consider covering paintings with archival materials such as acid-free paper or polypropylene plastic bags. This protects against dust, dirt, and potential scratches while allowing the artwork to “breathe” and avoid condensation.

  1. Handling Precautions:

When handling paintings, ensure your hands are clean and dry. Use gloves made of nitrile to prevent oils and dirt from transferring to the artwork. Support the painting from underneath, avoiding putting pressure on the canvas or paint surface.

  1. Rotation Practices:

If you have a substantial art collection, consider periodically rotating the displayed pieces with stored ones. This prevents prolonged exposure to light and environmental conditions, ensuring all artworks receive equal care and conservation attention.

The proper hanging and storage of paintings go beyond aesthetics – they are essential practices for preserving the artistic and monetary value of your collection. You’ll know how to hang a painting by adhering to these archival principles, you contribute to the longevity and beauty of the art you hold dear, allowing future generations to appreciate the same brilliance you see today.

For more information about Fine Art Conservation Laboratories’ art conservation services, please visit our website. If you’re in need of Las Vegas-based art conservation services, please feel free to visit our branch site here

 

Has your artwork already suffered damage? 

FACL is here to help you make that insurance claim.

Fine Art Conservation Laboratories’ 45 years of expertise in preserving and restoring art offers invaluable help and practical knowledge for helping people through the insurance claim process for damaged collectibles and art pieces. Our experienced team understands the complexities of insurance claims related to art, heirlooms, and antiques, providing reports that are properly prepared with information that the insurance company never puts in doubt. Fine Art Conservation Laboratories charges flat fees for this work, not a percentage of the claim settlement, and our expertise is honored nationwide. Let us help make the art, heirloom, and collectible part of the insurance claim process as seamless as possible and preserve your peace of mind. 

 

This blog post has been syndicated at ExpertClick.com. 

What does it mean that this article is “ syndicated”?

 

It’s a bit of a coup to get an article syndicated, and its certainly prestigious, as additional “proof” that the info and the author are considered far and wide authoritative and an expert in the field. So, enjoy and trust our content!! This article was syndicated for USA national redistribution.

When something is published, usually by a news source, and is made available through different venues for redistribution then it is said to be syndicated. Publications that are syndicated are usually considered of value as being from an expert, educational, new worthy or valuable for wide popular interest. See syndication page at the renowned publicity site: https://www.expertclick.com/NRWire/

This website’s syndication included:

1) Included in the ExpertClick Press Room as a ‘press release.’ (different than a ‘news release’)

2) Included in the ‘Speaker Bureau Platform Page.’

3) Shown on the front page of ExpertClick, in rotation with other most recent posts.

4) Shown in the ‘News Release Results page.’

5) Included on optimized for searches on all my topics of expertise.

6) Shown via RSS linked from the Press Room. (A specific way news is actively distributed within the industry)

7) Shown in the full RSS feed from ExpertClick. (Another, different specific way news is actively distributed within the industry)

8) Syndicated to LexisNexis.com As of 2006, the company had the world’s largest electronic database for legal and public-records related information, distributor of academic content and expert opinion.

This article has been syndicated at https://www.expertclick.com/NRWire/

 

Posted in Art Storage and Transport, Painting on canvas | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Las Vegas Art Rescue: Expert Tips for Restoring Art Shipping Damage

Scott M. Haskins, the President of Fine Art Conservation Laboratories (FACL) and a leading authority in the field, provides his expert insights.

a full body portrait of a victorian-looking man with a large rip going down the center. This is a result of art shipping damage.

Here’s an example of art shipping damage. Due to improper handling, this painting now needs extensive art conservation treatments

Damaged art delivery? Don’t panic! This guide has the steps you need to take right now. As an art conservator with years of experience, I’ve seen countless pieces arrive at my studio with art shipping damage. Shipping mishaps, bumpy moves, and even careless handling at Harry Reid Airport International can leave cherished artworks with cracks, tears, and faded colors. Whether you’re a seasoned collector or a first-time buyer, knowing what to do when disaster strikes can make all the difference in preserving your precious pieces.

Detecting the Damage from Art Shipping:

The first step is assessing the situation with a calm head and keen eyes. Remember, handling damaged artwork can worsen the situation, so resist the urge to poke, prod, or attempt DIY fixes. Here’s a quick guide to identifying common damage without causing further harm:

  • Surface Damage: Look for scratches, abrasions, or punctures on the artwork’s surface. For paintings, check for craquelure (fine cracks in the paint layer) or flaking paint. For sculptures, look for chips or dents. Don’t rub or touch the damaged area, as this could spread the damage or remove loose fragments.
  • Structural Damage: Check for tears, rips, or warping in the canvas, paper, or other support material. For sculptures, look for cracks or loose parts. Avoid moving the artwork excessively, as this could worsen the structural damage.
  • Fading or Discoloration: Observe any changes in the artwork’s color or vibrancy. This could be due to UV exposure, improper storage conditions, or chemical reactions. Don’t expose the artwork to direct sunlight or attempt any cleaning yourself.
portrait of a woman in pre-Victorian dress with extensive cracking and other age-related damage.

Years of improper storage and neglect have ravaged this art piece. It was nearly impossible to transport without causing further art shipping damage.

Find the Right Specialist for Damage in Art Shipping:

Once you’ve identified the type of damage, the next crucial step is finding the right professional to help. Remember, not all art conservators are created equal! Here are some tips for finding a qualified expert near you:

  • Ask around: Thankfully, Las Vegas has a robust art industry, so there are lots of potential resources out there for you. Talk to other art collectors, gallery owners, or museum curators for recommendations. Personal referrals are often the best way to find a reputable conservator.
  • Check credentials: Look for conservators who are members of professional organizations, such as the American Institute for Conservation (AIC) or the International Council of Museums (ICOM). These organizations have strict ethical and professional standards.
  • Research online: Use online directories like the AIC’s Professional Directory or the ICOM’s Find an Expert database to locate qualified conservators in your area.
  • Schedule consultations: Contact several conservators and schedule consultations to discuss your artwork and the damage it has sustained. This will help you assess their expertise and find the best fit for your needs caused by art shipping damage.
before and after pictures of the painting conservation process of a Madonna & child painting

Nuestra Senora De Los Angeles before & after FACL’s art conservation treatments.

Remember:

  • Don’t delay: The sooner you seek professional help, the better the chances of successful restoration. Delaying treatment can worsen the damage and make it more expensive to repair.
  • Document everything: Take clear photos of the artwork and the damage before moving it. This will be helpful for the conservator and for insurance purposes.
  • Be patient: Art conservation is a delicate process that takes time and expertise. Trust your chosen conservator and be patient with the restoration process.

By following these steps, you can navigate the stressful situation of a damaged artwork and ensure it receives the proper care it deserves. Remember, your treasured pieces deserve a second chance, and with the help of a qualified art conservator, you can bring them back to their former glory.

Bonus Tip: Las Vegas’ dry climate can pose unique challenges for artwork preservation. When storing your art, consider using a humidifier to maintain a consistent humidity level and protect your pieces from cracking or warping. Don’t forget to consult an art conservation professional to assess the conditions that your art pieces need.

Air purifier with ionization in the room on a light background, close-up.

I hope this guide helps you navigate the unexpected and keep your art collection safe and sound. Remember, prevention is always better than cure, so handle your artwork with care and store them in a controlled environment. And if disaster strikes, don’t panic – there’s always hope for restoration!

Need Help With Your Insurance Claim? 

Dealing with ruined paintings is stressful enough. Let us help you with your insurance claim for art shipping damage. Fine Art Conservation Laboratories’ 45 years of expertise in preserving and restoring art offers invaluable help and practical knowledge for helping people through the insurance claim process for damaged collectibles and art pieces.

Our experienced team understands the complexities of insurance claims related to art, heirlooms, and antiques, providing reports that are properly prepared with information that the insurance company never puts in doubt. Fine Art Conservation Laboratories charges flat fees for this work, not a percentage of the claim settlement, and our expertise is honored nationwide. Let us help make the art, heirloom, and collectible part of the insurance claim process as seamless as possible and preserve your peace of mind. 

FACL logo

This blog post has been syndicated at ExpertClick.com. What does it mean that this article is “syndicated”?

It’s a bit of a coup to get an article syndicated, and it’s certainly prestigious, as additional “proof” that the info and the author are considered far and wide authoritative and an expert in the field. So, enjoy and trust our content!! This article was syndicated for USA national redistribution.

When something is published, usually by a news source, and is made available through different venues for redistribution then it is said to be syndicated. Publications that are syndicated are usually considered of value as being from an expert, educational, new worthy or valuable for wide popular interest. See syndication page at the renowned publicity site: https://www.expertclick.com/NRWire/Releasedetails.aspx?id=301139https://www.expertclick.com/NRWire/

This website’s syndication included:

1) Included in the ExpertClick Press Room as a ‘press release.’ (different than a ‘news release’)

2) Included in the ‘Speaker Bureau Platform Page.’

3) Shown on the front page of ExpertClick, in rotation with other most recent posts.

4) Shown in the ‘News Release Results page.’

5) Included on optimized for searches on all my topics of expertise.

6) Shown via RSS linked from the Press Room. (A specific way news is actively distributed within the industry)

7) Shown in the full RSS feed from ExpertClick. (Another, different specific way news is actively distributed within the industry)

8) Syndicated to LexisNexis.com As of 2006, the company had the world’s largest electronic database for legal and public-records related information, distributor of academic content and expert opinion.

This article has been syndicated at https://www.expertclick.com/NRWire/Releasedetails.aspx?id=301139 

 

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How are Paintings Cleaned? – the Discovery Process and “Unknown Factor”

Do you have a painting that needs cleaning? Are you interested to know how decades (or centuries) old paintings are cleaned? This article is for you. One of the questions I am asked the most as an art conservator is, “How are paintings cleaned?”. Let’s explore the process together.

Victorian-era portrait by G.A. Cuomo circa 1880

The story of this painting’s restoration can help answer the question, “How are paintings cleaned?”. See below for its journey.

When a Las Vegas art gallery trusted me to restore a Victorian 1880s oil painting, I expected a straightforward removal of the yellowed varnish. Despite my 40 years of experience, I approached the task with humility. The importance of careful analysis and caution in the process of cleaning a painting cannot be overstated.

Many Las Vegans have the misconception that estimating the cleaning of a painting is a per-square-inch task that can be done over the phone. The reality is much more intricate. Safely cleaning aged oil paintings involves in-depth solubility tests with various solvents to make sure they dissolve the varnish without harming the original paint. We use tools such as head-mounted magnifiers and stereo binocular microscopes to delve into the details of each artwork, as varnish qualities vary significantly. 

In the case of this painting, beginning estimations suggested a $300 investment in time and materials for a complete and safe cleaning. However, the artwork presented unexpected challenges. This resulted in an expenditure of $1,200.00 to carefully eliminate every trace of yellowed varnish and dust without damaging the original paint.

The art conservation process, including cleaning, often involves a “discovery process,” that unveils hidden intricacies and demands flexibility. Estimates are typically precise, but occasional unknown factors that come up from time to time underscore the dynamic nature of art restoration.

This example gives insight into the complex world of estimating and discovery during the cleaning process. You can see now why answering the question, “How are paintings cleaned?” is not as straightforward as one would think. This article gives you the knowledge you need to talk to art conservators about the conservation process. We provide art conservation services to the vibrant community in Las Vegas, and we invite you to explore the fascinating journey of art conservation and restoration. Every masterpiece holds a unique story waiting to be revealed.

image of the Las Vegas welcome sign with the strip in the background

We provide art conservation services and consultations in the Las Vegas area

Do you need help with an insurance claim relating to artwork? We can help.

We can answer more questions than just, “How are paintings cleaned?”. Fine Art Conservation Laboratories’ 45 years of expertise in preserving and restoring art offers invaluable help and practical knowledge for helping people through the insurance claim process for damaged collectibles and art pieces. Our experienced team understands the complexities of insurance claims related to art, heirlooms, and antiques, providing reports that are properly prepared with information that the insurance company never puts in doubt. Fine Art Conservation Laboratories charges flat fees for this work, not a percentage of the claim settlement, and our expertise is honored nationwide. Let us help make the art, heirloom, and collectible part of the insurance claim process as seamless as possible and preserve your peace of mind. Click here for more about insurance claims.

This blog post has been syndicated at ExpertClick.com. 

What does it mean that this article is “ syndicated”?

It’s a bit of a coup to get an article syndicated, and it’s certainly prestigious, as additional “proof” that the info and the author are considered far and wide authoritative and an expert in the field. So, enjoy and trust our content!! This article was syndicated for USA National Redistribution.

When something is published, usually by a news source, and is made available through different venues for redistribution then it is said to be syndicated. Publications that are syndicated are usually considered of value as being from an expert, educational, new worthy or valuable for wide popular interest. See syndication page at the renowned publicity site: https://www.expertclick.com/NRWire/

This website’s syndication included:

1) Included in the ExpertClick Press Room as a ‘press release.’ (different than a ‘news release’)

2) Included in the ‘Speaker Bureau Platform Page.’

3) Shown on the front page of ExpertClick, in rotation with other most recent posts.

4) Shown in the ‘News Release Results page.’

5) Included on optimized for searches on all my topics of expertise.

6) Shown via RSS linked from the Press Room. (A specific way news is actively distributed within the industry)

7) Shown in the full RSS feed from ExpertClick. (Another, different specific way news is actively distributed within the industry)

8) Syndicated to LexisNexis.com As of 2006, the company had the world’s largest electronic database for legal and public-records related information, distributor of academic content and expert opinion.

This article has been syndicated at https://www.expertclick.com/NRWire/

 

Posted in art restoration of family portraits, Consultations, Painting on canvas | Tagged , , | 2 Comments

What to Do with Inherited Collections: Preserving Las Vegas

Do you care about your family history? This article is for you.

Inheriting a collection of photos, papers, books, and letters following the passing of a relative can pose both sentimental and logistical challenges. The question arises: What to do with inherited collections that may seem overwhelming due to space constraints, lack of personal interest, or inexperience in managing collections? At Fine Art Conservation Laboratories, we understand the delicate nature of such situations and offer solutions for preserving and valuing these cherished legacies, keeping the desert landscape of Las Vegas in mind.

blonde woman leans over a glass case in a museum

This woman marvels at the beautiful archive now in her possession. The question remains: What to do with inherited collections?

An inherited collection often forms an archive, a unique assortment of documents, photos, and three-dimensional objects, such as artworks, digital files, and manuscripts selected to preserve the essence of a person’s life. Our team specializes in the careful assessment of these diverse items, recognizing their collective power in narrating a captivating life history. Here are some tips for taking care of collections that you can do at home:

  1. Take Stock and Document: Start by carefully examining and documenting each piece in your newly inherited collection. Note any wear, tear, or damage, creating a simple list or using your smartphone to take pictures. This initial step helps you understand what needs attention.
  2. Find a Safe Storage Spot: Look for a cool, dry storage space at home, like a closet or under a bed. Shield the collection from extreme temperatures and moisture, using airtight containers or plastic sleeves for added protection. This storage approach can go a long way in preserving your items.
  3. Storytelling Preservation: Preserve the stories behind each item by writing them down or recording family anecdotes. This adds a personal touch to your collection, enhancing its value without any cost. Consider creating a simple digital document or a handwritten journal to capture these narratives.
  4. Regular Checks and Tender Loving Care: Schedule regular checks on your collection, ensuring it remains in good condition. Simple actions like dusting, adjusting storage conditions, and handling items with clean hands can contribute to their longevity. Consistent, gentle care is key, even if professional conservation is not immediately feasible.

Remember, even on a budget, there are practical steps you can take to care for your inherited collection, ensuring it remains a cherished part of your family’s history.

One interesting new way that people are preserving their family history is through genealogy sites. By photographing cherished heirlooms, digitizing important historical documents, and uploading them to genealogy websites, people have connected with long-lost relatives, shared family stories more easily via the internet, and improved their own family’s interest in family history. We can advise what to do with inherited collections in terms of preservation, restoration, and storage.

Although dry conditions are ideal for archival storage, the desert heat, dust, and pests are something to consider when handling collections. As you navigate the task of sorting through the archive, we emphasize the importance of maintaining the collection’s integrity, ensuring it tells a coherent and valuable story. While some may lament the decline of letter writing, we appreciate the intrinsic value of authentic signatures and the stories they tell. Recent auctions have demonstrated a growing market for entire archives, underscoring the enduring allure of tangible, historical artifacts.

Documents and books within the inherited collection hold particular significance. If they align with the individual’s work or training, they contribute to the archive’s richness. We encourage clients to preserve the archive as a cohesive unit, whether they choose to keep, sell, or donate it. By keeping records together, the unique perspective of one person’s life events is preserved, adding depth and authenticity to the entire collection.

Another significant part of any collection is artwork, such as paintings. It conveys the collector’s interests and even perspective of the world. Their value isn’t only sentimental; much artwork, especially if it’s old, has significant monetary value. It is important to consult an art conservation professional to ensure the proper storage and restoration treatments that each piece needs. Provenance, the history of ownership, plays a pivotal role in retaining the archive’s value, be it evidential or monetary. Our decades of experience in painting conservation have left many families with beautifully restored artworks that can be enjoyed by generations to come.

A portrait of George Washington, painted around 1800

Heirloom portraits, such as this one of George Washington, can be quite valuable. 

As you grapple with the identity embedded in the archive, we encourage thoughtful consideration of its entirety before deciding what to do with inherited collections. Rather than dissecting and selling individual components, or worse, discarding the archive, consider the option of donation. Fine Art Conservation Laboratories can guide you in preserving the structural and value-based integrity of the collection and even suggest potential donation avenues, including national archives, universities, community organizations, galleries, museums, and local institutions. Preserving your family member’s legacy becomes a meaningful endeavor, and our expertise ensures that the inherited collection remains a cohesive and valued representation of their life story.

an older, well-dressed white man with gloves on using a microscope to analyze a painting

Head Conservator, Scott M. Haskins analyzing the condition of the painting on the table

Are you also having trouble navigating an insurance claim that comes along with this inheritance? Fine Art Conservation Laboratories can help.

Fine Art Conservation Laboratories’ 45 years of expertise in preserving and restoring art offers invaluable help and practical knowledge for helping people through the insurance claim process for damaged collectibles and art pieces. Our experienced team understands the complexities of insurance claims related to art, heirlooms, and antiques, providing reports that are properly prepared with information that the insurance company never puts in doubt. Fine Art Conservation Laboratories charges flat fees for this work, not a percentage of the claim settlement, and our expertise is honored nationwide. Let us help make the art, heirloom, and collectible part of the insurance claim process as seamless as possible and preserve your peace of mind. 

This blog post has been syndicated at ExpertClick.com.

What does it mean that this article is “ syndicated”?

It’s a bit of a coup to get an article syndicated, and its certainly prestigious, as additional “proof” that the info and the author are considered far and wide authoritative and an expert in the field. So, enjoy and trust our content!! This article was syndicated for USA national redistribution.

When something is published, usually by a news source, and is made available through different venues for redistribution then it is said to be syndicated. Publications that are syndicated are usually considered of value as being from an expert, educational, new worthy or valuable for wide popular interest. See syndication page at the renowned publicity site: https://www.expertclick.com/NRWire/

This website’s syndication included:

1) Included in the ExpertClick Press Room as a ‘press release.’ (different than a ‘news release’)

2) Included in the ‘Speaker Bureau Platform Page.’

3) Shown on the front page of ExpertClick, in rotation with other most recent posts.

4) Shown in the ‘News Release Results page.’

5) Included on optimized for searches on all my topics of expertise.

6) Shown via RSS linked from the Press Room. (A specific way news is actively distributed within the industry)

7) Shown in the full RSS feed from ExpertClick. (Another, different specific way news is actively distributed within the industry)

8) Syndicated to LexisNexis.com As of 2006, the company had the world’s largest electronic database for legal and public-records related information, distributor of academic content and expert opinion.

This article has been syndicated at https://www.expertclick.com/NRWire/

 

Posted in Consultations, Historic Preservation, Insurance | Tagged , , | Leave a comment