Discover Your Painting’s Stories: How UV Blacklight Unveils Hidden Imperfections for Art Lovers in Santa Barbara, Los Angeles, Orange County, and Las Vegas

Can UV blacklight help protect your cherished artworks?

image of a UV Blacklight

Here’s an example of the type of UV Blacklight that art conservators often use to evaluate acrylic and oil paintings as well as other artworks

Absolutely! For art enthusiasts and collectors in Santa Barbara, Los Angeles, Orange County, and Las Vegas, doing an art evaluation and understanding the hidden layers and condition of your paintings is not just about conservation—it’s about connecting more deeply with the art you love. A UV blacklight can help you to know what’s going on with your artworks whether you’d like to get these hidden imperfections restored or whether you’d like to leave them untouched. UV blacklight reveals what’s hidden from the naked eye, ensuring that you know the condition of your artwork as it continues to tell its story beautifully and authentically.

Why Every Art Owner Needs a UV Blacklight to do Art Evaluation

Incorporating UV blacklight into your art care routine isn’t just for professionals. It’s a valuable tool for anyone passionate about preserving the beauty and integrity of their art collections. Whether you’re evaluating a potential new acquisition or occasionally checking the condition of a family heirloom, UV blacklight can reveal any previous restorations or hidden damages.

UV Light and Night Scenes: A Closer Look

image of a painting under UV light, inpainting glows brightly

New inpainting/retouchings show up bright with a UV black light

Imagine discovering more about a beloved night scene painting in your collection. A recent painting from Santa Barbara involved a night landscape that, under UV blacklight, showed a fascinating history of careful restorations. This ghostly glow, often misinterpreted as damage to the untrained eye, actually highlights the meticulous care is taken by art conservators to maintain the painting over decades—this story of preservation adds depth to the owner’s appreciation of the piece.

How UV Blacklight Reveals a Painting’s History During Art Evaluation

image of a portrait with missing areas on the left and inpainted missing areas on the right

Before and After Inpainting, Showing The Difference.

For those of you in Santa Barbara to Orange County and beyond who cherish every brushstroke and color in your paintings, UV blacklight can be your ally in uncovering the truth. It shows clearly where touch-ups have been made, allowing you to understand and appreciate the narrative of preservation behind each of your artworks. In this photo above, for example, the areas of inpainting over the white plaster would glow brightly under UV light. This knowledge empowers you as a collector, helping you make informed decisions with an art conservation professional about caring for and displaying your artwork.

 

Ensuring Excellence in Art Conservation and Art Evaluation

female art conservator carefully inpainting missing sections of an oil painting

FACL, Inc. art conservator carefully inpaints a section of this history painting done in oil paint

FACL, Inc. provides art conservation, evaluation, and more services in the Western part of the United States – from Santa Barbara County, Los Angeles, and Orange Counties, all the way to Salt Lake City, UT. We ensure that each artwork is preserved and restored to the highest standards set by organizations such as the AIC. Our work with this centuries-old painting pictured above demonstrated how UV blacklight could confirm the integrity of even the most delicate conservation efforts. It informed us where previous restoration efforts, such as inpainting, were located on the painting. This allowed us to tailor our treatments to take into account both the original materials as well as the art-conservation-grade pigments used for previous inpainting treatments. 

Fine Art Conservation Laboratories, Inc.’s Commitment to Art Conservation

At Fine Art Conservation Laboratories, we believe that every piece of art in your home deserves to be loved and preserved with the highest care. We, as art conservation professionals, use a UV blacklight as part of our commitment to providing you, the art collectors and lovers in **Santa Barbara**, **Los Angeles**, **Orange County**, **Las Vegas**, and beyond, with the best possible service, including artwork condition evaluation.

A Personal Note from Scott M. Haskins

image of a mature white man standing next to a middle aged white woman as they reference a large painting splayed out on a table in front of them. They are FACL art conservators.

FACL Art Conservators Scott and Virginia in the lab

“Over my decades of work in art conservation, I’ve seen how UV blacklight inspection has evolved from a niche technique to an essential tool in art preservation and painting evaluation. This tool allows us to peek into the past of each artwork, revealing stories of craftsmanship and care that are often left untold. These stories enrich your experience as a collector, can add cultural and even monetary value to your artwork, and deepen your connection to your art.”

Insurance Claim Guidance

Fine Art Conservation Laboratories’ 45 years of expertise in preserving and restoring art offers invaluable help and practical knowledge for helping people through the insurance claim process for damaged collectibles and art pieces. Our experienced team understands the complexities of insurance claims related to art, heirlooms, and antiques, providing reports that are properly prepared with information that the insurance company never puts in doubt. Fine Art Conservation Laboratories charges flat fees for this work, not a percentage of the claim settlement, and our expertise is honored nationwide. Let us help make the art, heirloom, and collectible part of the insurance claim process as seamless as possible and preserve your peace of mind. 

Conclusion

Embracing UV blacklight inspection is essential for any art lover in **Santa Barbara**, **Los Angeles**, **Orange County**, and **Las Vegas**. It not only ensures the condition of your artworks but also enriches your understanding and appreciation of them. If you’re ready to explore the hidden aspects of your art collection, contact Fine Art Conservation Laboratories, Inc. for a consultation that will change how you view and treasure art forever.

This blog post has been syndicated at ExpertClick.com. 

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What does it mean that this article is “ syndicated”?

It’s a bit of a coup to get an article syndicated, and its certainly prestigious, as additional “proof” that the info and the author are considered far and wide authoritative and an expert in the field. So, enjoy and trust our content!! This article was syndicated for USA national redistribution.

When something is published, usually by a news source, and is made available through different venues for redistribution then it is said to be syndicated. Publications that are syndicated are usually considered of value as being from an expert, educational, new worthy or valuable for wide popular interest. See syndication page at the renowned publicity site: https://www.expertclick.com/NRWire/

This website’s syndication included:

1) Included in the ExpertClick Press Room as a ‘press release.’ (different than a ‘news release’)

2) Included in the ‘Speaker Bureau Platform Page.’

3) Shown on the front page of ExpertClick, in rotation with other most recent posts.

4) Shown in the ‘News Release Results page.’

5) Included on optimized for searches on all my topics of expertise.

6) Shown via RSS linked from the Press Room. (A specific way news is actively distributed within the industry)

7) Shown in the full RSS feed from ExpertClick. (Another, different specific way news is actively distributed within the industry)

8) Syndicated to LexisNexis.com As of 2006, the company had the world’s largest electronic database for legal and public-records related information, distributor of academic content and expert opinion.

This article has been syndicated at https://www.expertclick.com/NRWire/

 

Posted in Art Storage and Transport, In Lab, Painting on canvas | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

FACL Conducts Mural Preservation & Removal in Hawaii – Edward T. Grigware’s “The Defiance of Pele”

You Won’t Believe the Mural Preservation Process!

image of the mural "Defying Pele"

Have you ever wondered how art conservators do mural removals or mural preservation? If so, this is the story you’ve been waiting for. At Fine Art Conservation Laboratories, Inc. (FACL), we take immense pride in our work preserving and restoring valuable public art pieces, especially murals. One of our projects, the removal and restoration of Edward T. Grigware’s murals at Brigham Young University–Hawaii, was both a challenge and a privilege. This article will take you through the entire process, offering a behind-the-scenes look at the art of mural conservation. If you love art, history, or are simply curious about how these intricate projects are carried out, you’re in for a treat!

 

History of the Murals 

Edward T. Grigware’s Legacy

image of artist Edward Grigware

image of mural artist Edward Grigware

Edward T. Grigware was an American painter known for his evocative and culturally significant murals. In 1958, he created two stunning murals: “The Defiance of Pele” and “Our Missionaries Bless the Islands.” These works of art are not only visually captivating but also deeply rooted in Hawaiian and religious history. “The Defiance of Pele” depicts Queen Kapi’olani defying the Hawaiian goddess Pele to demonstrate her Christian faith, while “Our Missionaries Bless the Islands” shows Latter-day Saint missionaries dedicating the Hawaiian islands for further missionary work. 

 

Historical Context

close up of little girls featured in "Defying Pele" mural

Edward T. Grigware, a celebrated artist known for his vibrant and narrative-driven murals, created “The Defiance of Pele” and “Our Missionaries Bless the Islands” in 1958. These works hold significant cultural value, depicting key moments in Hawaiian history and the impact of missionary work on the islands. However, the David O. McKay building at BYU–Hawaii, where the murals resided, was slated for imminent demolition. This urgency made it crucial to remove and preserve the murals. While the future location and reinstallation date of the murals remain uncertain, FACL’s immediate focus was on their preservation.

 

The Setting: BYU–Hawaii

Brigham Young University - Hawaii

the mural was located in Brigham Young University – Hawaii

The David O. McKay building is a central hub at BYU–Hawaii. It’s a place where students and faculty gather, and these murals have been a backdrop to countless events and memories. Laie, Oahu, with its rich cultural heritage, provided a fitting home for Grigware’s works. 

 

Murals’ Initial Condition

close-up of a woman defying Pele

close-up of a woman defying Pele

When we first assessed the murals, we found they had suffered from water damage, and previous local restoration attempts had been less than ideal. The paint layers were fragile, and the canvas had deteriorated in several places. It was a daunting task, but we were determined to restore these pieces to their former glory.

 

The Mural Preservation and Conservation Process

Pre-Removal Assessment

Before we could begin the delicate process of mural removal, a thorough pre-removal assessment was essential. Initial documents showed that a lead-based adhesive had been used to attach the murals to the wall. However, the exact difficulty and strength of this adhesive were unknown, necessitating on-site testing.

In late November 2023, FACL, Inc. conducted tests to evaluate the condition of the paint layers and the ease with which the canvas could be separated from the wall. Understanding these factors was crucial for determining the safest and most effective removal method. Our findings indicated that the adhesive was extremely strong and the paint was fragile, posing a significant challenge for the removal process.

 

Understanding Marouflage

The murals were created using a technique called marouflage, where the painting is done on canvas and then adhered to the wall. This method, popularized in 1700s France, was a common practice in the 20th century. Each mural is 11 feet high and 33 feet wide, divided into five sections, and painted in oil on canvas with an original varnish. This technique used to paint the mural helped FACL’s mural restoration team in storing and transporting the murals.

 

Mural Removal Process

Challenges Faced

One of the main challenges was dealing with the hard lead-based adhesive used to attach the canvas to the wall. The wall itself was constructed with a thin, unusually soft scratch coat over the plaster layer. Tests revealed that simply cutting the canvas off the wall would have been too uncontrollable, risking severe damage to the murals.

 

Removal Techniques Employed

FACL mural removal team applying vibration to detach the mural from the wall

FACL, Inc. mural removal team applies vibration to ease the detachment of the mural from the wall

The actual removal of the murals began in early December 2023. Given the strong lead-based adhesive and the fragile nature of the paint layers, a conventional removal method would have been too risky. Here, a stroke of genius came to Scott, FACL’s head art conservator. He was standing by the mural, out of ideas, when inspiration struck: using a vibration technique to fracture the scratch coat and separate the canvas from the wall.

This unconventional method required immense effort and careful precision, but it was worth it for the safety and preservation of the mural. We applied a protective “facing” to the surface, allowing us to handle the mural without directly touching the paint. This ensured that the delicate paint layers remained intact throughout the process. The mural was then carefully wrapped around large 3-foot tubes to avoid any kinking or damage during transport.

 

Handling and Transportation

Preparing for Transport

FACL mural team preparing the mural to be transported on large tubes

FACL, Inc. mural preservation team prepares the mural to be transported on large tubes

Handling and transporting such large and delicate pieces is no small feat. We took extensive measures to ensure the safety of the murals. The protective facing allowed us to move the canvases without risking further damage, and the careful wrapping around large tubes ensured they would not kink or warp.

"Defying Pele" mural on the tube, ready for transportation

“The Defiance of Pele” mural on the tube, ready for transportation

Scott’s Weighs in About the Preservation Process

“I remember the moment we successfully removed the first section of the mural. It was like unearthing a buried treasure. The relief and excitement on our team’s faces were palpable. We knew we were not just preserving a piece of art, but a piece of history.”

 

FACL’s Other Mural Projects

FACL technicians with a Banksy "Rat" piece

FACL, Inc. technicians with a Banksy “Rat” piece

This project is a prime example of the meticulous care and expertise required in mural restoration. At FACL, we’ve tackled numerous similar projects, each with its unique set of challenges. Whether it’s a historic mural in a public building or a cherished painting in a private collection, we approach each project with the same level of dedication and precision. Because each mural has its own unique issues and setting, a thorough pre-conservation inspection is crucial to creating a game plan for each project.

 

Broad Range of Services

Our comprehensive mural restoration services include everything from initial assessment and testing to removal, stabilization, and final restoration. We understand the importance of preserving cultural heritage, and our goal is to ensure that these artworks can be enjoyed by future generations.

 

Serving the Western United States

At FACL, we are proud to serve areas from Santa Barbara County, CA, to Orange County, CA, as well as Las Vegas, NV, and Salt Lake City, UT. Our door-to-door services make it easy for clients to get the care their artworks need without worrying about transportation.

“I’ve had the pleasure of working with clients across these areas, each with their unique stories and treasures. Whether it’s a mural in a historic building or a painting passed down through generations, the joy of seeing these pieces restored is immensely rewarding.” – Scott M. Haskins

 

Conclusion

Edward T. Grigware’s murals at BYU–Hawaii are a testament to his artistic vision. At Fine Art Conservation Laboratories, Inc., we are honored to play a role in preserving these masterpieces. Our expertise in dealing with weathered and damaged paintings and murals ensures that these artworks remain as vivid and impactful as the day they were created. If you have a piece of art that needs professional care, don’t hesitate to reach out. We’re here to help preserve your treasures for future generations.

Do you need guidance for making an insurance claim for art? FACL can help.

Fine Art Conservation Laboratories’ 45 years of expertise in preserving and restoring art offers invaluable help and practical knowledge for helping people through the insurance claim process for damaged collectibles and art pieces. Our experienced team understands the complexities of insurance claims related to art, heirlooms, and antiques, providing reports that are properly prepared with information that the insurance company never puts in doubt. Fine Art Conservation Laboratories charges flat fees for this work, not a percentage of the claim settlement, and our expertise is honored nationwide. Let us help make the art, heirloom, and collectible part of the insurance claim process as seamless as possible and preserve your peace of mind.

This blog post has been syndicated at ExpertClick.com.

What does it mean that this article is “ syndicated”?

It’s a bit of a coup to get an article syndicated, and its certainly prestigious, as additional “proof” that the info and the author are considered far and wide authoritative and an expert in the field. So, enjoy and trust our content!! This article was syndicated for USA national redistribution.

When something is published, usually by a news source, and is made available through different venues for redistribution then it is said to be syndicated. Publications that are syndicated are usually considered of value as being from an expert, educational, new worthy or valuable for wide popular interest. See syndication page at the renowned publicity site: https://www.expertclick.com/NRWire/

This website’s syndication included:

1) Included in the ExpertClick Press Room as a ‘press release.’ (different than a ‘news release’)

2) Included in the ‘Speaker Bureau Platform Page.’

3) Shown on the front page of ExpertClick, in rotation with other most recent posts.

4) Shown in the ‘News Release Results page.’

5) Included on optimized for searches on all my topics of expertise.

6) Shown via RSS linked from the Press Room. (A specific way news is actively distributed within the industry)

7) Shown in the full RSS feed from ExpertClick. (Another, different specific way news is actively distributed within the industry)

8) Syndicated to LexisNexis.com As of 2006, the company had the world’s largest electronic database for legal and public-records related information, distributor of academic content and expert opinion.

This article has been syndicated at https://www.expertclick.com/NRWire/

Posted in Murals, Saving Public Art, Travel | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Art Restoration: Water Damaged Mural in Los Angeles County- Hugo Ballin’s Art Deco Legacy

Unveiling the Secrets of Mural Restoration – Explore the Thrilling Journey of Preserving Cultural Heritage!

Join us on an enlightening journey as we delve into the fascinating world of mural art restoration through the experienced eyes of professional art conservator, Scott M. Haskins. Whether you’re captivated by the history of Los Angeles’ Golden Age, intrigued by painting and mural art conservation, or grappling with water-damaged artwork, this article promises to be an enlightening read for you!

“The first painting I ever worked on was high up on scaffolding in an 800 year old monastery at the top of a mountain in northern Italy, in front of a mural dated 1365, learning the restoration of murals from a very experienced veteran UNESCO mural conservator from Vicenza, who had worked on murals in the Buddhist temples in the jungles of Burma, and in the tombs of Egypt. 

Besides working shoulder to shoulder and benefiting from his inexhaustible experience, I loved hearing his stories about his travels and his emotions as he told about working among the tombs of the dead, and how he felt from that unseen world.”

  • Anecdote from Scott M. Haskins: Fine Art Conservation Laboratories, Inc. (FACL) Head Art Conservator

Banksy’s iconic rat at Fine Art Conservation Laboratories for reassembly, preservation, restoration and preparation for a massive tour.

Conserving Hugo Ballin’s Legacy

“These memories recently became very poignant as we worked on the art conservation of murals by Hugo Ballin, in the mausoleum of the Woodlawn Cemetery in Santa Monica, California. Not only was Hugo Ballin’s tomb 15 feet from where we worked but we were surrounded by thousands of the dead who were constantly looking over our shoulders on this two-week project to preserve and restore these 5 murals! I was vividly reminded of my mentor, Paolo Bacchin’s stories of working in the world of the dead.

Given the positive message of the faith-based murals we were restoring, I guessed that, if he was indeed present with us, Hugo Ballin was encouraging us, inspiring us, and collaborating for the successful completion and preservation of his artwork, and for the positive cultural heritage aspects of the public art.” – Scott

 

two men, one older, one younger, stand in front of the Hugo Ballin Mural in the Woodlawn Cemetery

FACL’s mural conservation crew for the Hugo Ballin mural – Art Conservator Scott M. Haskins and art conservation technician, Denver Dillon

FACL is under contract with the city of Santa Monica as an expert in protecting and conserving public art. An additional competitive vetting process awarded FACL the work at the City cemetery. Over the decades, since the murals were painted, several issues including infiltrations of water and the resulting mold, break up of plaster, and other problems were patched up with the proverbial “Band-Aid on an open artery” type of repair. Proper stabilization and preservation were desperately needed to preserve beautiful public works of art for future generations.

Restoring Art Damaged by Water and Mold

The Impact of Water Damage

Water damage can severely impact paintings, murals, and other valuable items. This type of damage not only affects the visual appeal but also the structural integrity of the artwork. Issues can range from discoloration and mold growth to more severe damage like warping or flaking paint.

flaking paint on a mural

Example of flaking paint on a mural caused by water damage.

The vintage murals, originally painted in Hugo Ballin’s famous recognizable art deco style, were thinly painted in oil on lightweight canvas, and then glued to the walls of the mausoleum with a wall paper paste. The extent of the water damage was heartbreaking. These materials did not hold up well with water seepage and the rough handling of inexperienced maintenance and restoration personnel over the years.

Mold had infiltrated the paint layers, and the colors were dull and faded. But we knew with the right care, these murals could be brought back to life.

The Restoration Process

Restoring art damaged by water and mold involves several meticulous steps. First, we stabilize the artwork to prevent further deterioration. This may involve drying out the affected areas, removing mold, and treating the surface to halt the spread of damage.

Each mural needed to be carefully removed from the wall to be cleaned. FACL conservators needed to clean off the mold, remove loose dried glues, re-do busted-up plaster, and properly remount the original paintings on canvas back into their original positions on their original walls. Surface cleaning and revarnishing were done after this removal. All of this work was done with professional art conservation standards of practice and ethics.

Scott M. Haskins in the removal stage of the mural restoration process

Finally, we work on restoring the artwork to its original condition. This can involve repainting areas where the paint has flaked off, fixing any warping or structural damage, and applying protective coatings to prevent future damage.

“One of my favorite parts of the restoration process is seeing the colors come back to life. It’s like watching the artwork breathe again after being suffocated for so long.” – Scott

Related Services for Water-Damaged Art

At FACL, we offer a comprehensive range of services to address water and mold-damaged artworks. This includes decontamination, stabilization, and preventive measures to protect against future damage. Whether it’s a beloved family heirloom or a valuable masterpiece, we’re committed to preserving the integrity and beauty of your art.

 

Hugo Ballin: An Artist of Many Talents

Hugo Ballin was an extraordinary artist known for his remarkable contributions to both the art world and the film industry. Born in 1879, Ballin was an American artist, muralist, author, and film director. His creative journey took him from painting exquisite murals to directing memorable films. This unique blend of artistic talent and cinematic vision made him a standout figure of his time. 

“When I first learned about Ballin’s dual career, I was fascinated. It’s rare to see such a seamless blend of cinematic and artistic talent. His films had a painterly quality, while his murals told stories with the depth of a film director’s eye.” – Scott 

Hugo Ballin – Art Deco Mural Artist & Film Director

From the Silver Screen to the Painting of Public Art Murals

Hugo Ballin was, perhaps, the highest quality and most well-known mural artist in Southern CA, particularly in the Los Angeles County area, in the 1st half of the 1900s. In addition to his work in Southern California, he was well-known nationwide and was even part of the art competition at the 1932 Summer Olympics.

Before dedicating his life to mural painting, Hugo Ballin made a name for himself in Hollywood. In 1917, he began working for Goldwyn Pictures in New Jersey as an art director and production designer. By 1921, he moved to Los Angeles at the request of Samuel Goldwyn. Ballin directed several silent films, bringing his artistic vision to life on the silver screen. This experience in the film industry influenced his approach to art, allowing him to create murals that are not only visually stunning but also narratively rich. Ballin’s training in classical painting is evident in his murals, completed across the United States, which eventually made him one of the foremost muralists in the Los Angeles area. Notable works include murals at the W. M. Keck Foundation Central Rotunda at Griffith Observatory and a set of frescoes depicting the life and death of Christ, located at Woodlawn Memorial Cemetery in Santa Monica, where Ballin is also buried. Each piece tells a story, capturing the essence of the subjects with meticulous detail and vibrant colors. FACL, Inc. consulted on the project at Griffith Observatory. 

“I remember visiting the Griffith Observatory as a kid, being awestruck by the grandeur of those murals. Little did I know, years later, I would be part of the team helping to preserve Ballin’s incredible legacy.” –  Scott 

Hugo Ballin Murals at the Griffith Observatory – Mount Hollywood in Griffith Park

Conclusion

Hugo Ballin’s legacy as a mural artist and movie director is enduring. His work continues to inspire and captivate audiences. At Fine Art Conservation Laboratories, Inc., we are honored to play a role in preserving his murals. Our expertise in dealing with water-damaged painting restoration ensures that these masterpieces remain as vivid and impactful as the day they were created.

For more information on our services and how we can help with your art restoration needs or questions about art conservation, contact us today at 805-564-3438. 

Protecting the beauty and integrity of your artwork is not just our job—it’s our passion.

Serving the Western United States

Fine art conservation laboratory logo

Fine Art Conservation Laboratories, Inc. proudly serves areas from Santa Barbara County, CA to Orange County, CA, as well as Las Vegas and Salt Lake City, UT. Our work in art and restoration helps maintain the cultural and historical treasures found in these regions. We offer door-to-door services, ensuring that your paintings and murals receive the care they need without you having to worry about transportation.

“I’ve had the pleasure of working with clients across these areas, each with their unique stories and treasures. Whether it’s a mural in a historic building or a painting passed down through generations, the joy of seeing these pieces restored is immensely rewarding.” – Scott

Art Insurance Claim Guidance

Fine Art Conservation Laboratories’ 45 years of expertise in preserving and restoring art offers invaluable help and practical knowledge for helping people through the insurance claim process for damaged collectibles and art pieces. Our experienced team understands the complexities of insurance claims related to art, heirlooms, and antiques, providing reports that are properly prepared with information that the insurance company never puts in doubt. Fine Art Conservation Laboratories charges flat fees for this work, not a percentage of the claim settlement, and our expertise is honored nationwide. Let us help make the art, heirloom, and collectible part of the insurance claim process as seamless as possible and preserve your peace of mind. 

This blog post has been syndicated at ExpertClick.com. 

What does it mean that this article is “ syndicated”?

It’s a bit of a coup to get an article syndicated, and its certainly prestigious, as additional “proof” that the info and the author are considered far and wide authoritative and an expert in the field. So, enjoy and trust our content!! This article was syndicated for USA national redistribution.

When something is published, usually by a news source, and is made available through different venues for redistribution then it is said to be syndicated. Publications that are syndicated are usually considered of value as being from an expert, educational, new worthy or valuable for wide popular interest. See syndication page at the renowned publicity site: https://www.expertclick.com/NRWire/

This website’s syndication included:

1) Included in the ExpertClick Press Room as a ‘press release.’ (different than a ‘news release’)

2) Included in the ‘Speaker Bureau Platform Page.’

3) Shown on the front page of ExpertClick, in rotation with other most recent posts.

4) Shown in the ‘News Release Results page.’

5) Included on optimized for searches on all my topics of expertise.

6) Shown via RSS linked from the Press Room. (A specific way news is actively distributed within the industry)

7) Shown in the full RSS feed from ExpertClick. (Another, different specific way news is actively distributed within the industry)

8) Syndicated to LexisNexis.com As of 2006, the company had the world’s largest electronic database for legal and public-records related information, distributor of academic content and expert opinion.

This article has been syndicated at https://www.expertclick.com/NRWire/

 

 

Posted in Murals, Saving Public Art, Travel | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Heirloom Restoration… It may be treasured but is it worth it? Salt Lake City, Utah

This blog post has been syndicated at ExpertClick.com. What does it mean that this article is “ syndicated”? See end of article for explanation.

by Scott M. Haskins, Art Conservator

Salt Lake City – Art restoration of heirloom oil paintings is a vexing problem to think about because not many people really know the science and the professionalism required to do the right job. I often meet with people throughout Utah to discuss painting conservation questions for works of inherited treasures at people’s homes and offices (we pick up and deliver with people I meet). And this last week I even consulted for a couple of projects for the City of Salt Lake.

Here’s a testimonial from one of our clients last week that wanted to reassure you that it was an interesting and stimulating process to discuss your preservation questions with us:

Artworks and heirlooms being passed down to the next generation are full of memories… “triggers” for good family history stories and I always enjoy speaking with people about their family heirlooms. These types of items with positive vibes help people to remember their loved ones. But even though these types of items have most often been treasured, once they change hands as they have been passed down in the family, I am often asked, “Is it worth restoring?”

How can something be priceless when its not worth anything? What is worth saving and protecting of our “stuff?” Some people “get it” at a DNA level that family history is important for lots of profound reasons and some of those reasons are multigenerational. Other need some time to come to their senses.

Some people would have just thrown this keepsake from grandparents away!

Consider that there are three types of value I urge you to consider: 1. financial value, 2. emotional value and/or 3. historical value to be considered. It’s doubly nice when your emotional ties or historical connection, like with a family heirloom, is also a really nice work of art. Affecting value, is the condition and the needed oil painting restoration (painting conservation, art conservation, art restoration) like rip repair, cleaning a painting, flaking paint repair.
This family in Pasadena, California is now handing down the treasures that the parents collected as their family grew. There are lots of memories. We were honored to preserve, restore and assist them with a couple of dozen items. This is their quick testimonial.

BEFORE someone tosses your family heirloom painting in the trash, give me a call!! Here’s my mobile 805 570 4140

Here is our webpage for other testimonials. Scroll down the page… I think you’ll find several of the examples interesting and entertaining: https://www.FineArtConservationLab.com/testimonials

Here is our YouTube playlist of other testimonials for family heirlooms: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL41D80C1C65FF2CE7

This painting exhibits warping from water damage, as well as flaking and discoloration

This painting was neglected in a storage area that took on water, damaging more than just a few boxes of stuff. Memories, family history and family member’s hearts were damaged. But as hopeless as this flaking and discoloration may seem, give us a call to discuss 805 564 3438

Article Syndication Graphic.jpg

This blog post has been syndicated at ExpertClick.com. What does it mean that this article is “ syndicated”? See end of article for explanation.

Its a bit of a coup to get an article syndicated, and its certainly prestigious, as additional “proof” that the info and the author are considered far and wide authoritative and an expert in the field. So, enjoy and trust our content!! This article was syndicated for USA national redistribution.

When something is published, usually by a news source, and is made available through different venues for redistribution then it is said to be syndicated. Publications that are syndicated are usually considered of value as being from an expert, educational, new worthy or valuable for wide popular interest. See syndication page at the renowned publicity site: https://www.expertclick.com/NRWire/Releasedetails.aspx?id=303362

This website’s syndication included:

1) Included in the ExpertClick Press Room as a ‘press release.’ (different than a ‘news release’)

2) Included in the ‘Speaker Bureau Platform Page.’

3) Shown on the front page of ExpertClick, in rotation with other most recent posts.

4) Shown in the ‘News Release Results page.’

5) Included on optimized for searches on all my topics of expertise.

6) Shown via RSS linked from the Press Room. (A specific way news is actively distributed within the industry)

7) Shown in the full RSS feed from ExpertClick. (Another, different specific way news is actively distributed within the industry)

8) Syndicated to LexisNexis.com As of 2006, the company had the world’s largest electronic database for legal and public-records related information, distributor of academic content and expert opinion.

This article has been syndicated at https://www.expertclick.com/NRWire/Releasedetails.aspx?id=303362

Posted in Disaster/Emergency Response, In Lab, Painting on canvas | Tagged | Leave a comment

Your Art Collection and Flooding: Preventing Water Damage from rains in Santa Barbara, Los Angeles, and Orange County

Are you concerned about the effect of flooding on your art collection? This article is for you. As torrential rains and floods wreak havoc in regions like Los Angeles County, Orange County, and Santa Barbara, art collectors face a significant risk: water damage to their prized paintings and artwork. From cherished family heirlooms to valuable masterpieces, the threat of water-damaged paintings and artwork looms large, posing a potential threat to the artworks. Here are some essential tips to safeguard your collection and prevent water damage to your paintings.

 

Understanding the Risk of Water Damage to Paintings and Art

The current weather conditions, increases significantly the risk of water damage to artwork. Floodwaters can seep into homes, causing damage to paintings, whether they are displayed prominently or stored in basements or attics. It’s crucial to recognize the potential dangers posed by flooding and take proactive measures to protect your art collection.

image of a flooded living room

Learn to protect your artwork from water damage so you know what to do if this happens to your home!

Assessing Vulnerabilities

Begin by assessing the vulnerabilities of your home or art storage space. Identify areas prone to water intrusion, such as basements, ground-level rooms, or areas near windows and doors. Inspect for signs of existing water damage, such as dampness, mold growth, or discoloration on walls and ceilings. Understanding these vulnerabilities will help you develop a targeted strategy to mitigate the risk of water damage.

Implementing Protective Measures Against Water Damaged Art 

Take steps to protect your artwork from water damage. Install drainage systems, such as gutters and downspouts, to direct rainwater away from your home’s foundation. Seal windows and doors to prevent water intrusion during heavy rainfall. Consider investing in flood barriers or sandbags to create a protective barrier around your home in flood-prone areas. Additionally, elevate valuable artworks to higher ground or store them in waterproof containers to minimize the risk of water exposure.

Maintaining Climate Control

Maintain stable indoor humidity levels to prevent moisture buildup, which can lead to mold growth and deterioration of artwork. Consider speaking to a professional art conservator about the ideal humidity and temperature levels for your artwork. Use dehumidifiers and air conditioning systems to regulate humidity levels, especially in areas with high humidity or during periods of heavy rainfall. Proper ventilation is essential to ensure air circulation and prevent condensation, which can contribute to water damage. Many art collectors choose professional art storage facilities for their pieces that are not on display.

flat boxes organized in a sturdy, gray, metal shelving unit

ensuring a proper storage environment for your artwork is a key part of preventing water-damaged paintings and artwork

Seeking Professional Assistance

In the event of water damage to your artwork, seek immediate assistance from professional art conservators like Scott M. Haskins and his team at FACL, Inc. Their expertise in water damage restoration can help salvage and restore water-damaged paintings, preserving their beauty and historical significance. With specialized techniques and equipment, they can assess the extent of the damage, remove moisture, and treat affected artwork to prevent further deterioration.

By taking proactive measures and seeking professional assistance when needed, art collectors can minimize the risk of water damage to their paintings and artwork. With careful planning and preparation, you can protect your art collection from the devastating effects of floods and rain, ensuring that your prized possessions remain safe and preserved for future generations.

Remember, prevention is key to preserving the beauty and integrity of your artwork. Stay vigilant, stay prepared, and safeguard your art collection from water damage in flood-prone areas.

Has the Rain Already Damaged Your Paintings? We Can Help with an Insurance Claim!

Fine Art Conservation Laboratories’ 45 years of expertise in preserving and restoring art offers invaluable help and practical knowledge for helping people through the insurance claim process for damaged collectibles and art pieces. Our experienced team understands the complexities of insurance claims related to art, heirlooms, and antiques, providing reports that are properly prepared with information that the insurance company never puts in doubt. Fine Art Conservation Laboratories charges flat fees for this work, not a percentage of the claim settlement, and our expertise is honored nationwide. Let us help make the art, heirloom, and collectible part of the insurance claim process as seamless as possible and preserve your peace of mind. 

Art conservator, Virginia Panizzon, cleaning water damage on paintings

Professional art conservators have the expertise to mitigate the effects of water damage on paintings.

This blog post has been syndicated at ExpertClick.com. What does it mean that this article is “ syndicated”?

It’s a bit of a coup to get an article syndicated, and its certainly prestigious, as additional “proof” that the info and the author are considered far and wide authoritative and an expert in the field. So, enjoy and trust our content!! This article was syndicated for USA national redistribution.

When something is published, usually by a news source, and is made available through different venues for redistribution then it is said to be syndicated. Publications that are syndicated are usually considered of value as being from an expert, educational, new worthy, or valuable for wide popular interest. See the syndication page at the renowned publicity site: https://www.expertclick.com/NRWire/

This website’s syndication included:

1) Included in the ExpertClick Press Room as a ‘press release.’ (different than a ‘news release’)

2) Included in the ‘Speaker Bureau Platform Page.’

3) Shown on the front page of ExpertClick, in rotation with other most recent posts.

4) Shown in the ‘News Release Results page.’

5) Included on optimized for searches on all my topics of expertise.

6) Shown via RSS linked from the Press Room. (A specific way news is actively distributed within the industry)

7) Shown in the full RSS feed from ExpertClick. (Another, different specific way news is actively distributed within the industry)

8) Syndicated to LexisNexis.com As of 2006, the company had the world’s largest electronic database for legal and public-records related information, distributor of academic content and expert opinion.

This article has been syndicated at https://www.expertclick.com/NRWire/

 

Posted in Painting on canvas, Water Damage | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Top 5 Art and Painting Restoration Tips for New Art Owners in Los Angeles County and Orange County, California

Whether you’ve inherited cherished artworks, are contemplating starting an art collection, or are a budding hobbyist art collector, understanding the fundamentals of art conservation is paramount to preserving the integrity and value of your precious pieces. Embarking on a journey as an art owner is an exhilarating endeavor, filled with boundless creativity and cultural enrichment. However, navigating the realm of art conservation-related issues can be daunting for newcomers. Here are the top five things that new art owners should know about art and painting restoration-related issues in Los Angeles County and Orange County, California.

Understanding the Importance of Art Conservation:

As a new art owner, recognizing the significance of art and painting restoration is crucial. Artworks are susceptible to various environmental factors, including humidity, temperature fluctuations, and light exposure, which can lead to deterioration over time. By prioritizing what’s known more formally as art conservation, you can prolong the lifespan of your collection and maintain its aesthetic and monetary value for generations to come.

image of a painting of the Lady of Guadalupe before and after painting conservation. From "Art Restoration Tips for New Art Owners in Los Angeles County and Orange County, California"

Identifying Common Art and Painting Conservation Concerns

Familiarizing yourself with common conservation concerns empowers you to detect potential issues early on. Look out for signs of insect damage, such as surface distortions or visible holes, which can be prevalent in the mild climate of Southern California. Additionally, be mindful of factors like fading pigments, flaking paint, and unstable framing, as these can indicate underlying conservation issues that require prompt attention.

 

Seeking Professional Guidance and Expertise

When confronted with art and painting conservation-related challenges, don’t hesitate to seek professional guidance and expertise. Establishing relationships with reputable art conservators operating in your area, such as Los Angeles County or Orange County, California, is essential for addressing conservation issues effectively. These experts possess the knowledge, skills, and resources necessary to assess, diagnose, and remediate conservation concerns with precision and care. 

Implementing Preventative Conservation Measures

Prevention is key when it comes to art conservation. Take proactive steps to safeguard your artworks by implementing preventative conservation measures. Store your pieces in a stable environment with controlled temperature and humidity levels, minimize exposure to direct sunlight, and handle artworks with care to prevent physical damage. By adopting these practices, you can mitigate the risk of conservation issues and preserve the longevity of your collection.

Educating Yourself Continuously

Art and painting conservation is an ever-evolving field, and staying informed about new developments and best practices is essential for art owners. Take advantage of educational resources, workshops, and seminars offered by museums, galleries, and conservation organizations in Los Angeles County and Orange County, California or by visiting an art conservator’s website, such as FACL’s. By continuously educating yourself about art conservation, you can make informed decisions regarding the care and preservation of your artworks.

Scott M. Haskins and Virginia Panizzon, veteran art conservators at Fine Art Conservation Laboratories

In conclusion, embarking on the journey of art ownership is a rewarding experience enriched by the beauty and cultural significance of artworks. By understanding the importance of art conservation, identifying common conservation concerns, seeking professional guidance, implementing preventative measures, and educating yourself continuously, you can navigate the complexities of art conservation-related issues with confidence and ensure the long-term preservation of your treasured collection in Los Angeles County and Orange County, California.

Has Your Art Already Been Damaged?

Fine Art Conservation Laboratories’ 45 years of expertise in preserving and restoring art offers invaluable help and practical knowledge for helping people through the insurance claim process for damaged collectibles and art pieces. Our experienced team understands the complexities of insurance claims related to art, heirlooms, and antiques, providing reports that are properly prepared with information that the insurance company never puts in doubt. Fine Art Conservation Laboratories charges flat fees for this work, not a percentage of the claim settlement, and our expertise is honored nationwide. Let us help make the art, heirloom, and collectible part of the insurance claim process as seamless as possible and preserve your peace of mind.

This blog post has been syndicated at ExpertClick.com. What does it mean that this article is “ syndicated”?

It’s a bit of a coup to get an article syndicated, and its certainly prestigious, as additional “proof” that the info and the author are considered far and wide authoritative and an expert in the field. So, enjoy and trust our content!! This article was syndicated for USA national redistribution.

When something is published, usually by a news source, and is made available through different venues for redistribution then it is said to be syndicated. Publications that are syndicated are usually considered of value as being from an expert, educational, new worthy or valuable for wide popular interest. See syndication page at the renowned publicity site: https://www.expertclick.com/NRWire/

This website’s syndication included:

1) Included in the ExpertClick Press Room as a ‘press release.’ (different than a ‘news release’)

2) Included in the ‘Speaker Bureau Platform Page.’

3) Shown on the front page of ExpertClick, in rotation with other most recent posts.

4) Shown in the ‘News Release Results page.’

5) Included on optimized for searches on all my topics of expertise.

6) Shown via RSS linked from the Press Room. (A specific way news is actively distributed within the industry)

7) Shown in the full RSS feed from ExpertClick. (Another, different specific way news is actively distributed within the industry)

8) Syndicated to LexisNexis.com As of 2006, the company had the world’s largest electronic database for legal and public-records related information, distributor of academic content and expert opinion.

This article has been syndicated at https://www.expertclick.com/NRWire/

 

Posted in art restoration of family portraits, Art Storage and Transport, Painting on canvas | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Mural Restoration of Public Art and Saving Bees in North Hollywood’s Chandler Corridor

This blog post has been syndicated at ExpertClick.com. What does it mean that this article is “ syndicated”? See end of article for explanation.

By Alice Taylor, FACL Conservation Technician

During the past few weeks, Fine Art Conservation Laboratories has had the unique experience of requiring the help of beekeepers to save a large beehive, part of a public art restoration project on “Hollywood Movie Crew,” a mural by Karl Abramovic located along the Chandler Corridor in North Hollywood, Los Angeles. The mural, measuring 15’ by 30’, was painted in 2001 as part of the City’s effort to create an outdoor, public art gallery along the Corridor. FACL and Art and Mural Conservator Scott M. Haskins were contracted by the City of Los Angeles’s Department of Cultural Affairs (DCA)in January 2024 to clean, remove graffiti and old varnish, and revarnish three of the Corridor’s high-quality murals.

“Hollywood Movie Crew” by Karl Abramovic (before art restoration services – photo from Yelp.com: https://www.yelp.com/biz/chandler-murals-los-angeles)

The issue involving the bees went unnoticed at first, as the mural was inspected toward the end of an overcast day when there was no activity around the hive. During a later visit, however, a small hole along the upper border became apparent. The hole was small—about the size of a half dollar coin—and seemed to be the entrance to a bee colony, as honey bees were swarming around it.

Beekeeper’s Removal, the company called to inspect the issue, said that the hive was gigantic: it had been forming for several years and probably consisted of over 10,000 bees. According to their expertise, the age of the hive was indicated by the black hue surrounding the hole.

Needless to say, the only option was to preserve the bee colony as well as the mural, and the DCA of Los Angeles and the building’s owner were both in agreement. Yet, the colony posed a major obstacle to the mural’s planned conservation treatments. The beekeepers explained that in order to safely remove and relocate the bees, they had to open up the wall, and it was unknown at first as to how large their hole would have to be. Would it only be one or two feet across, or would the size of the hive require them to take out a giant portion of the mural– up to ten feet? Either way, more work would be required on the mural than was initially anticipated.

Beekeeper’s Removal had to follow a specific process in order to safely remove and relocate the bees. After the wall was opened up, the beekeepers removed the wax and honey, separating the honeycombs into two different buckets. This was in order to locate the queen, a crucial component for a functioning beehive.

The queen bee is distinct in that she is the only female with fully-developed ovaries, so she alone has the responsibility of reproducing for the hive, sometimes laying up to 2,000 eggs per day! She also produces chemical scents that regulate the hive’s ability to function in harmony, quite literally making her the ruler of the colony. Because of this, worker bees tend to follow their queen, so Beekeeper’s Removal was able to tell when she had been removed from the mural, and the bucket the bees attached themselves to indicated where she was located.

Removing the bees (photo provided by Denver Dillon)

Removing the bees from the mural was a delicate process. Luckily, the beekeepers only had to open up a 1’ by 2’ area in the wall and a couple of other smaller holes. While filling and painting the holes had to be added to the mural’s treatment list, it allowed for the preservation of both the artwork and the beehive, and was undoubtedly worth the extra steps.

Of course, we at FACL know the importance of public art for local communities. However, saving the bee colony, rather than simply exterminating it, was also extremely important (for both the bees, and for us)! Because of their ability to pollinate, bees are the source behind one-third of the world’s food, making them essential for our survival. Even so, many bee populations are threatened, endangered, and/or actively declining due to threats such as pollution and climate change. So, whenever possible, problematic beehives should be dealt with by professionals who understand how to preserve the bees’ lives throughout the removal process. Ultimately, FACL was very content to be a part of this unique effort to save a very large and old colony and to do our part in promoting environmental conservation.

Fine Art Conservation Laboratories has been saving murals since 1975, an effort which began in Italy and has continued to several countries and states within the U.S. Just recently, in the interim of the bee removal, an emergency project was accomplished in Oahu, Hawaii, where two large and historic murals were saved from demolition with the help of FACL and Scott M. Haskins. The murals were painted by Edward T. Grigware in 1958 and are known worldwide. Their loss would have been devastating had Scott not been consulted, assessed, and created a treatment plan that allowed them to be safely removed.

“Queen Kapiolani Defying the Goddess Pele” by Edward T. Grigware (before restoration and removal services – photo provided by Scott M. Haskins)

Removing each of the two 11’ x 33’ murals in five separate panels, just as they were originally installed by the artist (photo provided by Scott M. Haskins)

The work being undertaken on “Hollywood Movie Set” is in collaboration with the artist Karl Abramovic. Working with living artists to preserve, restore, or ensure the longevity of their works during their initial creation is something often done in collaboration with the local governments and municipalities who sponsor the public art. However, FACL consults on private projects as well.

Besides saving the bees that had made their home in Abramovic’s “Hollywood Movie Set,” the biggest takeaway from this mural restoration project for artists and those who maintain public art concerns the choice of varnish. This mural’s varnish, which was twenty years old, did a poor job of protecting the work and ended up looking very bad. The choice of product was made without consulting art restoration professionals, who carefully vet products for long term preservation, aging, and other issues. Hence, this mural has fallen apart rather quickly, despite its location in a very desirable place for preservation (no direct sun, for example).

Another instance of poorly chosen varnish can be seen in Porterville, California, on a beautiful mural sponsored by the city. The 100-foot mural, located in the downtown central park, utilized a bad quality varnish similar to the Hollywood Movie Set, which pulled apart the paint layers and required extensive work last year by the artist in addition to FACL’s stabilizing treatments.

“Marching Through Time” by Glen Hill

(after restoration – photo provided by Scott M. Haskins)

Original paint being pulled off the mural due to original coating varnish… in other words, always consult an art restoration professional when choosing varnish!

(Photo provided by Scott M. Haskins)

FACL offers professional consultations and art restoration services in the Los Angeles and Orange County areas, as well as in Santa Barbara County, Riverside, Carmel/Monterey, Las Vegas, and Utah. If you are seeking an expert opinion on your painting, mural, or other work of art, feel free to reach out to Scott M. Haskins:

Phone: (805) 570-4140

Email: faclartdoc@gmail.com

This blog post has been syndicated at ExpertClick.com. What does it mean that this article is “ syndicated”? 

Its a bit of a coup to get an article syndicated, and its certainly prestigious, as additional “proof” that the info and the author are considered far and wide authoritative and an expert in the field. So, enjoy and trust our content!! This article was syndicated for USA national redistribution.

When something is published, usually by a news source, and is made available through different venues for redistribution then it is said to be syndicated. Publications that are syndicated are usually considered of value as being from an expert, educational, new worthy or valuable for wide popular interest. See syndication page at the renowned publicity site: https://www.expertclick.com/NRWire/

This website’s syndication included:

1) Included in the ExpertClick Press Room as a ‘press release.’ (different than a ‘news release’)

2) Included in the ‘Speaker Bureau Platform Page.’

3) Shown on the front page of ExpertClick, in rotation with other most recent posts.

4) Shown in the ‘News Release Results page.’

5) Included on optimized for searches on all my topics of expertise.

6) Shown via RSS linked from the Press Room. (A specific way news is actively distributed within the industry)

7) Shown in the full RSS feed from ExpertClick. (Another, different specific way news is actively distributed within the industry)

8) Syndicated to LexisNexis.com As of 2006, the company had the world’s largest electronic database for legal and public-records related information, distributor of academic content and expert opinion.

This article has been syndicated at https://www.expertclick.com/NRWire/

 

Sources:

https://www.beekeepersremoval.com/

https://www.iucnredlist.org/

https://www.clemson.edu/

Posted in Murals, Saving Public Art | Leave a comment

Identifying and Preventing Warping from Water Damage in Paintings in Santa Barbara, Thousand Oaks, Los Angeles, and Orange County

Are you noticing a slight curve or bend in your oil or acrylic paintings? Perhaps the frame seems slightly warped? Don’t overlook these signs, as they could indicate underlying issues that require attention. In this article, we’ll delve into how to identify warping from water damage in paintings and frames, focusing on potential causes prevalent in areas like Santa Barbara, Thousand Oaks, Los Angeles, and Orange County, which have experienced heavy rainfall recently.

Identifying Warping:

Warping from water damage in paintings can manifest in various ways, from slight distortions in the canvas or panel to noticeable bends in the frame. When examining your artwork, look for any irregularities in its shape or surface. Place the painting on a flat surface and observe if it lays completely flat or if there are areas where it lifts or curves upwards. Additionally, inspect the frame for any signs of bending or warping along its edges or corners.

This painting exhibits warping from water damage, as well as flaking and discoloration

This painting exhibits warping from water damage, as well as flaking and discoloration

Potential Causes of Warping:

Warping from water damage in paintings is a common issue that art collectors face. The recent heavy rainfall in areas like Santa Barbara, Thousand Oaks, Los Angeles, and Orange County can exacerbate this issue. When water seeps into the painting’s support structure, whether it’s canvas or wood panel, it can cause expansion and distortion. This expansion puts pressure on the paint layers, leading to warping over time. In frames, moisture absorption can cause the wood to swell and warp, affecting the overall shape and stability.

Preventing Warping:

To prevent warping from water damage in paintings, it’s essential to protect your artwork from humidity, especially in regions prone to heavy winter rainfall like Santa Barbara, Thousand Oaks, Los Angeles, and Orange County. Ensure proper storage in a controlled environment with stable humidity levels. Avoid hanging paintings in areas exposed to moisture, such as basements or near windows. Additionally, invest in quality framing materials that are resistant to warping and moisture damage. Improper storage can lead to a host of problems in your paintings, including water damage.

The warping on this painting is being relaxed with an art conservator's hot table.

The warping in this painting is being relaxed with an art conservator’s hot table.

Consulting a Conservator:

If you suspect warping from water damage in your paintings, it’s crucial to consult with an experienced art conservator. They can assess the extent of the damage and recommend appropriate conservation measures. Fine Art Conservation Laboratories’ conservators service the Santa Barbara, Thousand Oaks, Los Angeles, and Orange County areas and are well-versed in addressing water-related issues in artworks. Don’t hesitate to seek professional guidance to preserve the beauty and integrity of your precious pieces; unaddressed water damage can contribute to further deterioration of your precious artwork.

old american painting that is flaking

Warping from water damage is one of the many issues that this painting faces

By understanding how to identify warping and addressing potential causes like water damage, you can protect your oil and acrylic paintings from deterioration. Stay vigilant, especially in times of inclement weather, and consult with a conservator for expert advice tailored to your artwork’s needs.

Do you need help navigating the insurance claim process?

Fine Art Conservation Laboratories’ 45 years of expertise in preserving and restoring art offers invaluable help and practical knowledge for helping people through the insurance claim process for damaged collectibles and art pieces. Our experienced team understands the complexities of insurance claims related to art, heirlooms, and antiques, providing reports that are properly prepared with information that the insurance company never puts in doubt. Fine Art Conservation Laboratories charges flat fees for this work, not a percentage of the claim settlement, and our expertise is honored nationwide. Let us help make the art, heirloom, and collectible part of the insurance claim process as seamless as possible and preserve your peace of mind.

Do you have questions about water damage on acrylic and oil paintings? Please call 805-564-3438 or email flora.faclofficemanager@gmail.com.

This blog post has been syndicated at ExpertClick.com.

What does it mean that this article is “ syndicated”?
It’s a bit of a coup to get an article syndicated, and its certainly prestigious, as additional “proof” that the info and the author are considered far and wide authoritative and an expert in the field. So, enjoy and trust our content!! This article was syndicated for USA national redistribution.
When something is published, usually by a news source, and is made available through different venues for redistribution then it is said to be syndicated. Publications that are syndicated are usually considered of value as being from an expert, educational, new worthy or valuable for wide popular interest. See syndication page at the renowned publicity site: https://www.expertclick.com/NRWire/
This website’s syndication included:
1) Included in the ExpertClick Press Room as a ‘press release.’ (different than a ‘news release’)
2) Included in the ‘Speaker Bureau Platform Page.’
3) Shown on the front page of ExpertClick, in rotation with other most recent posts.
4) Shown in the ‘News Release Results page.’
5) Included on optimized for searches on all my topics of expertise.
6) Shown via RSS linked from the Press Room. (A specific way news is actively distributed within the industry)
7) Shown in the full RSS feed from ExpertClick. (Another, different specific way news is actively distributed within the industry)
8) Syndicated to LexisNexis.com As of 2006, the company had the world’s largest electronic database for legal and public-records related information, distributor of academic content and expert opinion.
This article has been syndicated at https://www.expertclick.com/NRWire/

Posted in Consultations, Disaster/Emergency Response, Painting on canvas | Tagged , , | 2 Comments

What to Do About Flaking on Oil or Acrylic Paintings

Have you noticed developing flaking on oil or acrylic paintings in your collection? If so, don’t worry! Your paintings are not doomed. Flaking is a common issue that art owners may encounter, particularly with paintings done in oil or acrylic. It’s a distressing sight to see paint coming off the surface, but understanding the potential causes of flaking and how to prevent it is crucial for preserving the integrity of your cherished artworks.

flaking paint on a mural

In addition flaking on oil and acrylic paintings, murals can also suffer this type of damage.

Causes of Flaking on Oil or Acrylic Paintings

Flaking on oil or acrylic paintings occurs when the bond between the layers of paint and the surface they’re applied to breaks down. There are several potential causes for this phenomenon:

  1. Poor Adhesion: One of the primary reasons for flaking on oil or acrylic paint is poor adhesion between the paint layers and the surface they’re painted on. This can happen if the surface wasn’t adequately prepared before painting or if the wrong type of primer was used. Without a strong bond, the paint can easily peel away from the surface over time.
  2. Moisture Damage: Exposure to excessive moisture or humidity is another common cause of flaking and other problems. When moisture seeps into the layers of paint, it can weaken the bond between them and the underlying surface. This is particularly problematic for paintings done on canvas, as the fabric is more susceptible to moisture damage than other surfaces.
  3. Temperature Fluctuations: Extreme changes in temperature can also contribute to flaking on oil or acrylic paintings. When the materials in a painting expand and contract due to fluctuations in temperature, it puts stress on the paint layers. Over time, this stress can cause the paint to crack and eventually flake off.
  4. Mechanical Damage: Physical impacts or abrasions can weaken the paint layers and cause them to flake off. This can happen during handling, transportation, or if the painting comes into contact with a rough surface.
two family heirloom portraits are pictured. The one on the left depicting a Victorian woman has flaking running across the sitter's face. The portrait of a man on the right needs to be cleaned of grime and other signs of weathering.

Two family heirloom portraits are pictured. The one on the left depicting a Victorian woman has flaking running across the sitter’s face. The portrait of a man on the right needs to be cleaned of grime and other signs of weathering.

Preventing Flaking on Oil or Acrylic Paintings:

Preventing flaking requires proactive measures to protect the integrity of the paint layers and the surface they’re applied to:

  1. Proper Storage: Store paintings in a controlled environment with stable temperature and humidity levels. Avoid hanging them in areas prone to moisture, such as basements, bathrooms, or near windows. Many collectors opt to store artwork that is not on display in professional art storage facilities.
  2. Gentle Handling: Handle paintings with care, avoiding excessive pressure or touching the painted surface directly. Use protective coverings during transportation and storage to prevent physical damage.
  3. Regular Inspection: Periodically inspect your paintings for any signs of flaking or deterioration. Early detection allows for prompt action to prevent further damage. If you notice any flaking or other issues, consult with an art conservator for professional advice.

Consulting an Art Conservator:

If you encounter flaking on your oil or acrylic paintings, it’s essential to seek guidance from an experienced art conservator. They have the expertise to assess the extent of the damage and recommend appropriate conservation treatments.

When discussing flaking with a conservator, provide details about the painting’s history, current condition, and any noticeable changes. Clear communication ensures the conservator understands the unique needs of your artwork and can provide tailored solutions to address flaking issues.

By understanding the potential causes of flaking and taking proactive measures to prevent it, you can protect your paintings and preserve them for future generations to enjoy.

In summary, flaking is a common issue that can affect paintings done in oil or acrylic. By understanding the causes of flaking and taking preventive measures, you can safeguard your cherished artworks and ensure their longevity. If you encounter flaking on your paintings, consult with an art conservator for professional guidance and conservation treatments tailored to your artwork’s specific needs.

a female art conservator applies a treatment to a mural that is laid out on a table

Julia Betancor working on WPA murals at Fine Art Conservation Laboratories with Scott M. Haskins

Do you have questions about flaking on oil or acrylic paintings? Call 805-564-3438 or text at 805-570-4140 or email at flora.faclofficemanager@gmail.com

Do you need help navigating the insurance claim process for artwork?

Fine Art Conservation Laboratories’ 45 years of expertise in preserving and restoring art offers invaluable help and practical knowledge for helping people through the insurance claim process for damaged collectibles and art pieces. Our experienced team understands the complexities of insurance claims related to art, heirlooms, and antiques, providing reports that are properly prepared with information that the insurance company never puts in doubt. Fine Art Conservation Laboratories charges flat fees for this work, not a percentage of the claim settlement, and our expertise is honored nationwide. Let us help make the art, heirloom, and collectible part of the insurance claim process as seamless as possible and preserve your peace of mind.

This blog post has been syndicated at ExpertClick.com.

What does it mean that this article is “ syndicated”?
It’s a bit of a coup to get an article syndicated, and its certainly prestigious, as additional “proof” that the info and the author are considered far and wide authoritative and an expert in the field. So, enjoy and trust our content!! This article was syndicated for USA national redistribution.
When something is published, usually by a news source, and is made available through different venues for redistribution then it is said to be syndicated. Publications that are syndicated are usually considered of value as being from an expert, educational, new worthy or valuable for wide popular interest. See syndication page at the renowned publicity site: https://www.expertclick.com/NRWire/
This website’s syndication included:
1) Included in the ExpertClick Press Room as a ‘press release.’ (different than a ‘news release’)
2) Included in the ‘Speaker Bureau Platform Page.’
3) Shown on the front page of ExpertClick, in rotation with other most recent posts.
4) Shown in the ‘News Release Results page.’
5) Included on optimized for searches on all my topics of expertise.
6) Shown via RSS linked from the Press Room. (A specific way news is actively distributed within the industry)
7) Shown in the full RSS feed from ExpertClick. (Another, different specific way news is actively distributed within the industry)
8) Syndicated to LexisNexis.com As of 2006, the company had the world’s largest electronic database for legal and public-records related information, distributor of academic content and expert opinion.
This article has been syndicated at https://www.expertclick.com/NRWire/

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Identifying and Preventing Water Damage on Paintings in Rainy Santa Barbara and Los Angeles

Has the rainy weather in the Santa Barbara and Los Angeles areas left you with water damage on paintings? Do you see signs of mold, flaking, blistering, discoloration, or warping on your artwork? Don’t fret! This article is for you.

Rainy weather might be great for the environment, but it unfortunately might put artworks at risk. Understanding how to spot and prevent water damage on paintings and other artworks is crucial for art collectors. Water damage on paintings is often subtle, and early detection is the key to preserving your valuable pieces. Here’s a guide to help you navigate the potential risks, protect your art, and engage with art conservation professionals.

Water damage on paintings and murals

Here’s an example of water damage on paintings: stains, vast areas of fogged or bloomed varnish and crystallization of varnish resin.

Spotting Water Damage:

Water damage to paintings can manifest in various ways, from discoloration and warping to mold growth. Keep a keen eye on any changes in the paint surface, such as flaking or blistering, as these may indicate exposure to moisture. Discoloration, often appearing as yellow or brown stains, is another sign of water damage. Check the back of the artwork for signs of mold, which thrives in damp conditions. If you notice any of these signs, it’s time to take action and consult with an art conservation professional.

Preventing Water Damage:

Prevention starts with proper storage and display. Ensure your artworks are not in direct contact with walls, and keep them away from windows and doors where water can seep in. Since the Los Angeles, Santa Barbara, and other areas in Souther California are receiving a lot of rain recently, it’s important to maintain stable humidity levels in your art storage space, as fluctuations can contribute to water damage. During rainy seasons, consider using dehumidifiers and inspecting your storage area for leaks. Regularly check the condition of your roof and windows to prevent water intrusion.

image of an HVAC system. Climate control is very important for preventing water damage on paintings

Climate control is very important for preventing water damage on paintings

Engaging with Art Conservation Professionals:

If you suspect that you have water damage on paintings or other artworks, consult with an art conservation professional promptly. Keep in mind that every art conservation/ restoration project is different, so an expert is needed to determine the appropriate treatments for your artwork. They have the expertise to assess the extent of the damage and recommend appropriate restoration measures. When reaching out to a conservator, provide detailed information about the artwork, including its dimensions, history, current condition, and any noticeable changes. Clear communication ensures the conservator understands the unique needs of your artwork.

art conservator inpainting repaired area of water stains on a a painting

Professional art conservators have the expertise to mitigate the effects of water damage on paintings and other artworks

Tip Summary:

  • Water Damage Identification: Learn to recognize signs of water damage on paintings like discoloration, warping, and mold growth.
  • Preventive Measures: Protect your art by ensuring proper storage, stable humidity levels, and regular maintenance.
  • Consulting Conservators: Engage with art conservation professionals promptly for expert assessment and restoration.

Has the water already gotten to your artwork? Fine Art Conservation Laboratories can help with your insurance claim! 

Fine Art Conservation Laboratories’ 45 years of expertise in preserving and restoring art offers invaluable help and practical knowledge for helping people through the insurance claim process for damaged collectibles and art pieces. Our experienced team understands the complexities of insurance claims related to art, heirlooms, and antiques, providing reports that are properly prepared with information that the insurance company never puts in doubt. Fine Art Conservation Laboratories charges flat fees for this work, not a percentage of the claim settlement, and our expertise is honored nationwide. Let us help make the art, heirloom, and collectible part of the insurance claim process as seamless as possible and preserve your peace of mind. See this article for a couple short stories about art owners’ journey with insurance claim and fire/ water damage. Please call 805-564-3438 if you have questions or would like to schedule a consultation with our expert art conservators. 

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