Spanish Colonial Art Restoration – The Earliest European Art in California

Meet “Nuestra Senora De Los Angeles” from the Historical California Spanish Ranch Vejar Chapel

After two centuries, Vejar chapel painting looks like new once again

See Daily Bulletin News Article: https://www.dailybulletin.com/2021/07/19/after-two-centuries-vejar-chapel-painting-looks-like-new-once-again/?fbclid=IwAR0KD0WmIR5Q36s3TUpYHMdHkox0BaeIncJzLot6xkRLrNMqsrdO3ixJuBs

This article has been syndicated at www.NewsReleaseWire.com/257855 What does it mean to be syndicated? See end of article.

Nuestra Senora De Los Angeles

Of course, all of the work that we perform saving, preserving and restoring paintings (including murals) is a team effort. Great credit for this excellent result for the extremely important and historic early painting in California‘s history goes to Virginia Panizzon, Senior Paintings Conservator with collaboration from Juliann Stephenson, Painting Conservator and several others. We also congratulate Jorge Santos for the exceptional Spanish cColonial reproduction frame which was custom-made.

A couple of days ago a well attended and very excited celebration and inauguration was held by the Pomona Valley Historical Society at the Palomares Adobe to receive back the very important painting of a Madonna and Child which had undergone extensive heart conservation treatment. The process of rallying support and finding funding was an excellent example of what can be done in a small historical society to be dynamic in their activities that energize their members and be proactive in their purposes.

I was asked to post the treatments we performed on this project. Here is the summary: Interestingly, there is an archive photograph of this painting in 1940 and it looks to be in the same condition as when we received it for treatment.

It had been worked on previously, a couple of times, which included, over-aggressive cleaning, abundant repainting, at some point it was stretched smaller and then returned to its original size (as can be seen in the before photograph). We assume that at the time of it’s over-aggressive cleaning that the palm tree in the lower right and a crown on both the Madonna and the child were removed. In a very old newspaper article, it mentions that the painting was in a fire. Some heat damage of the thicker paint on the Madonna’s dress was visible. In the BC photograph, the palm tree is much more visible than could be seen with the naked eye and we were surprised to find it and the crowns with UV inspection. Under the stereo binocular microscope the traces of those removed details appeared to be original. Generally, the painting was very dusty, grimy, smokey-looking, pinpoint flaking, poor stretcher bars, 1920’s cheap frame.

In the lab with painted wooden artifacts/sculptures of Catholic saints from Mission San Juan Capistrano.

First order of business was to stabilize the flaking with appropriate adhesives with heat on the vacuum hot table. Once we were more confident in the painting’s ability to withstand cleaning of the front and back, those treatments were undertaken after tests proved them to be safe for the artwork. The cleaning was undertaken with a series of techniques and solutions based on the sensitives. The lining was undertaken with Beva 371b with a polyester interleaf between the original fabric and the epoxy fiber plate (G10). The artwork was mounted onto new stretcher bars with an aesthetically pleasing loose lining (so as to not see the G10). Fills were undertaken with acrylic gesso; very controlled and accurate inpainting was accomplished with several techniques based on the best compatibility, optically (but no oil paint is ever utilized in our lab). The crowns and the palm tree were glazed to be more visible but no paint layers or details were invented to make them look as if they were undamaged and original. The initial vanish prior to inpainting was Regalrez and the final varnish is Laropal A81. 

Before and After Inpainting, Showing The Difference.

 

What does it mean that this article is “ syndicated”?

When something is published, usually by a news source, and is made available through different venues for redistribution then it is said to be syndicated. Publications that are syndicated are usually considered of value as being from an expert, educational, new worthy or valuable for wide popular interest. See syndication page at the renowned publicity site: www.NewsReleaseWire.com/258892

This website’s syndication included:

1) Included in the ExpertClick Press Room as a ‘press release.’ (different than a ‘news release’)

2) Included in the ‘Speaker Bureau Platform Page.’

3) Shown on the front page of ExpertClick, in rotation with other most recent posts.

4) Shown in the ‘News Release Results page.’

5) Included on optimized for searches on all my topics of expertise.

6) Shown via RSS linked from the Press Room. (A specific way news is actively distributed within the industry)

7) Shown in the full RSS feed from ExpertCick. (Another, different specific way news is actively distributed within the industry)

8) Syndicated to LexisNexis.com As of 2006, the company had the world’s largest electronic database for legal and public-records related information, distributor of academic content and expert opinion.

Mural Conservation Treatments and Historic Preservation Studies Discover Important Italian Artwork and History In The Garda Lake Area

See it at: www.NewsReleaseWire.com/257855

Questions? Call Scott M. Haskins, Virginia Panizzon Art Conservators 805 564 3438 faclofficemanager@gmail.com

Posted in Consultations, In Lab, Painting on canvas, Professional activities | Tagged | Leave a comment

Mural Conservation Treatments and Historic Preservation Studies Discover Important Italian Artwork and History In The Garda Lake Area

This article has been syndicated at www.NewsReleaseWire.com/257855 What does it mean to be syndicated? See end of article.

Magical murals are being discovered from the early 1600s in northern Italy that are an amazing example of the genius of illusion that started in Italy and then became the European Baroque standard of beauty. Historic preservation and mural conservation efforts are discovering these treasures in the town of Lonato del Garda on Garda Lake, between Verona and Brescia in Northern Italy.

Scott M. Haskins, Principle at FACL, mural and painting conservator, author is a technical and media consultant on this project (805 564 3438 office, faclartdoc@gmail.com). He has had connections with interesting art restoration projects in Northern Italy since 1975 and is honored and excited to be associated with a world class project that is rediscovering 900 years of masterpiece quality murals that even the local public is not aware of. The artwork is being studied by art historians and scholars as new details are discovered during the mural conservation which include the removal of layer of overpaint that have obliterated some of the murals and amazing stucco sculptures for centuries. The ceiling affrescos are particularly noteworthy as they are very early (1625) examples of Illusionistic Italian Baroque art expression that became all the rage internationally during the next 150 years.

Ask how you, your family, your organization can have a long lasting, historical influence on, and be recognized for, the art history and historic preservation in this north Italian, Garda Lake region and gain special access for visits, tours, and access to local food products.

The complex with the murals etc is next to this medieval fortress

Garda Lake has been a highly appreciated resort area since Roman times and therefore has always attracted the highest quality craftsmen and artists. On one side of the lake is Brescia and the other side is Verona, both centers of culture, cuisine, viticulture, tourism… and “ the good life.” Garda Lake is a unique combination of Alpine and Mediterranean flavors. It is an area where viticulture goes back to pre-Roman times, lemons are grown and where olive trees are a distinctive feature of the landscape. The region around Garda Lake is one of the most varied and colorful cultural destinations in Europe for the highest quality artistic and cultural traditions, its natural resources and environment and its incomparable culinary traditions. Internationally, well known, communities (even in Roman times) like Desenzano and Sirmione are right next door to Lonato. Practically out the back door of the complex that houses the murals of this project is a medieval fortress, used even by the Venetian Republic into the 1700’s. Venice’s influence on the art in this area is clearly evident. At the turn of the head, in the location of this historic preservation project, 700 years of top quality architecture can be viewed.

As often happens in Italy, the outside of the building where the murals of this project are housed does not reflect the treasure contained within.

In addition to the main vault of the nave, are additional areas of Venetian influenced affrescos and decorative stucco work that is amazing. The preservation and professional restoration of these works of art, and the entire building complex, has taken decades. At the time these murals were painted, perhaps the greatest Baroque master was Tintoretto in Venice and his impressionistic painting technique was 200 years ahead of its time. That same quality can be seen in these murals!

Italian painting conservators Sandra Ragazzoni and Luisa Pari  (39 329 0116712 lu.luisapari@gmail.com) head the art conservation team working on the murals in the Church of Santa Maria del Corlo. Scott M. Haskins, painting and mural conservator from the USA is part of the conservation team as consultant and trouble shooter.(805 564 3438 office, faclartdoc@gmail.com)

This project is supported by: The Community of Lonato del Garda, the ProLoco Fondazione Madonna del Corlo – O.N.L.U.S ( Ente proprietario della chiesa Madonna del Corlo), The Lombardy Dept of Tourism, The Wine Growers of Northern Italy, The Lombardy Region of Northern Italy, Italian Dept. of Tourism, The University of ……, The Catholic Church and FACL, inc. (Fine Art Conservation Laboratories) in California, USA.

What does it mean that this article is “ syndicated”?

When something is published, usually by a news source, and is made available through different venues for redistribution then it is said to be syndicated. Publications that are syndicated are usually considered of value as being from an expert, educational, new worthy or valuable for wide popular interest. See syndication page at the renowned publicity site: www.NewsReleaseWire.com/257855

This website’s syndication included:

1) Included in the ExpertClick Press Room as a ‘press release.’ (different than a ‘news release’)

2) Included in the ‘Speaker Bureau Platform Page.’

3) Shown on the front page of ExpertClick, in rotation with other most recent posts.

4) Shown in the ‘News Release Results page.’

5) Included on optimized for searches on all my topics of expertise.

6) Shown via RSS linked from the Press Room. (A specific way news is actively distributed within the industry)

7) Shown in the full RSS feed from ExpertCick. (Another, different specific way news is actively distributed within the industry)

8) Syndicated to LexisNexis.com As of 2006, the company had the world’s largest electronic database for legal and public-records related information, distributor of academic content and expert opinion.

#MuralConservation #MuralRestoration #ItalianArtRestoration #GardaLake #LonatoDelGarda #ScottMHaskins #FineArtConservationLaboratories #ArtConservation #ArtRestoration #MuralRestorationExpert #Sirmione #Desenzano

Posted in Consultations, FACL in the media, Historic Buildings - Construction Sites, Historic Preservation, Murals, Speaking Engagements, Travel | Tagged , | Comments Off on Mural Conservation Treatments and Historic Preservation Studies Discover Important Italian Artwork and History In The Garda Lake Area

Should I Put Glass In Front Of My Painting When I Frame It?

This article has been syndicated at www.NewsReleaseWire.com/257654  What does it mean to be syndicated? See end of article.

I’m often asked this question by people who are reframing their artwork, so here are a few thoughts that may guide you… or confuse you. Either way, people usually find my answer interesting.

Of course, the motivation for putting glazing (the general term for glass, plexiglass, etc) in front of artwork is for protection. It can be protection against grime, smoke etc. or it could be protection against clueless people or vandalism.

Years ago the De Young Fine Arts Museum in San Francisco put glazing on front of all of their paintings as a result of their paranoia and their incapability of keeping the general public from touching the artwork. I guess you can tell from how I phrase that last sentence that I don’t like glazing in front of artwork if it cannot be helped. But some artwork is too fragile and it is accepted that glazing should cover prints, watercolors, perhaps collectibles in shadowboxes and not left naked to the open air.

Anti-glare technology increasingly gets better. It usually, also, has a UV filter

Also, glazing with UV filters can help substantially (not not 100%) to reduce fading (notice I did not say eliminate fading). Also, the magic of technology can greatly reduce reflections which can kill the viewing and enjoying experience.

So, in summary here are some reasons to put glazing in front of artwork:

  1. Protection against touching and vandalism (this might be a good idea in a house with kids and lots of traffic).
  2. Protection of very sensitive artwork, like a lot of contemporary pieces.
  3. UV protection (not fool proof)
  4. Protection against grime, smoke etc.

Unprotected pastels and other sensitive or easily damaged art won’t make it to the next generation if you don’t take action to protect it.

TIP: If you frame art with glazing, space the glazing away from touching the art. I like to space it at least 1/8” but ¼ is better. And remember, Plexiglas creates a static field which pulls pastel dust off the artwork… so maybe even more space than ¼” is better. But here are some arguments against glazing on oil/acrylic paintings:

If you were going to put glazing in front of your artwork then consider that in our art conservation laboratory we often pick broken glass out of artwork which includes scratched and sliced paint layers or worse. So, if you’re shipping artwork take note that this is the most often accident that causes damage of artwork by broken glass.  If you are going to ship, transport or store paintings either remove the glass, seriously tape over the glass so it doesn’t go everywhere when it breaks or replace it with plexi. If you live in earthquake/hurricane country and if your artwork is knocked off the wall and the glass breaks at 3 o’clock in the morning you’re going to be walking through it. Remember also that violent storms and earthquakes turn items hanging on your walls turn into projectiles. If you want suggestions on how to avoid this go to: https://www.HangAFramedItemSafely.com

A truly heartbreaking situation but a result of a very stupid collector who shipped this gorgeous, high quality, valuable artwork with little protection. The glass broke and then slid around in the packing which broke up the paint layers. We could have stabilized and restored this to look perfect, preserving its beauty and most of its value but the collector didn’t want to spend the money and I think they threw it away!!

In the art conservation lab we often find mold between the glazing and the artwork. The glazing creates a microclimate inside so be especially aware if you live in regions of high humidity. I would especially avoid glazing in tropical regions.

The biggest reason for me, however, is that I don’t want anything between me and the artwork when I enjoy or study it.

Thanks to art historian, scholar, author Dr. Anna Dantes (Rome) for updating us on the painting conservation treatments of this world famous painting by Caravaggio that has to be worth somewhere around $350 million. It has just returned on view after a meticulous study and exacting art conservation treatments. A surprising decision by museum admin., yet wonderful for those that take the time to stand in front of the painting, they removed the protective glazing from in front of the painting so there is nothing that stands between you and the genius and impact of the artwork.

Here is Dr. Dantes’ comments in Italian: La tela di Caravaggio senza filtri, così come era stata concepita, con tutta la forza che la materia è in grado di trasmettere. Il capolavoro di Michelangelo Merisi, Fanciullo con canestra di frutta, si può finalmente ammirare senza il vetro.

Dopo un’accurata anamnesi dell’opera che, partendo dai dati di archivio, ha permesso di ricostruire la storia conservativa del dipinto e anche le movimentazioni e i restauri che si sono succeduti nel tempo, il quadro è stato sottoposto alla verifica puntuale dello stato di conservazione, che ha confermato le ottime condizioni e la possibilità di rimuovere il vetro.

A seguito di tale rimozione è stato comunque avviato un monitoraggio costante per verificare eventuali modificazioni della superficie dipinta.

Questions: Call us! Scott M. Haskins, Virginia Panizzon Art Conservators 805 564 3438 faclofficemanager@gmail.com

What does it mean that this article is “ syndicated”?

When something is published, usually by a news source, and is made available through different venues for redistribution then it is said to be syndicated. Publications that are syndicated are usually considered of value as being from an expert, educational, new worthy or valuable for wide popular interest. See syndication page at the renowned publicity site: www.NewsReleaseWire.com/257091

This website’s syndication included:

1) Included in the ExpertClick Press Room as a ‘press release.’ (different than a ‘news release’)

2) Included in the ‘Speaker Bureau Platform Page.’

3) Shown on the front page of ExpertClick, in rotation with other most recent posts.

4) Shown in the ‘News Release Results page.’

5) Included on optimized for searches on all my topics of expertise.

6) Shown via RSS linked from the Press Room. (A specific way news is actively distributed within the industry)

7) Shown in the full RSS feed from ExpertCick. (Another, different specific way news is actively distributed within the industry)

8) Syndicated to LexisNexis.com As of 2006, the company had the world’s largest electronic database for legal and public-records related information, distributor of academic content and expert opinion.

Posted in Consultations, Disaster/Emergency Response, In Lab, Painting on canvas, Saving Public Art | Tagged | Comments Off on Should I Put Glass In Front Of My Painting When I Frame It?

Frankie Boyer On Biz Talk Radio Interviews Art Expert Scott M. Haskins

This article has been syndicated at www.NewsReleaseWire.com/257635   What does it mean to be syndicated? See end of article.

Interview June 16th, 2021

Nationally awarded Radio Radio Talk Show Host Frankie Boyer in Boston Mass for Biz Talk Radio pulled in Scott M. Haskins, Art Expert and Mural Expert for an interview a day or so ago to discuss several interesting art related issues that are in the news.

Graffiti Art, Street Art… Save It As Valuable Contemporary Art? Or Is Removing Graffiti A Useless Waste Of Effort?

https://www.fineartconservationlab.com/murals/graffiti-art-public-art-street-art-vandalism-sign-of-the-times-valuable-contemporary-art/

Fine Art Conservation Laboratories helps to save mural by Banksy

Scott M. Haskins, Art Conservator (center) positions redwood slats of removed Banksy mural as he consults with Paul Schurch, Master Woodworker on a plan for mounting the mural to an aluminum honeycomb panel.

Graffiti art, a spray-painted image is, at least briefly, free for everyone to behold… until somebody defaces it, or a property owner paints over it. Banksy’s public art reputation endures, first because its become valued as a counter culture, bad-boy, illegal art with urban grit by the public (not just in financial terms for $millions), partly because of a crazy variety of efforts to salvage the art. Some suspect a brilliant marketing strategy. It seems funny to me, that the same spray paint applied illegally can be considered and esteemed so differently.

So, is street art a result of a chaos theory or is it genius? Could the thoughts of insightful Anna Dantes (Rome), Art Scholar, intellectual, Art History Expert be applied? “ Art is a form a genius. Actually, it’s the highest level of genius because to move you, it doesn’t require an explanation.”

Click here for the 10 minute show segment and forward to the 20:40 mark: https://www.spreaker.com/user/10863617/fb-061721-11

 

Frankie found Scott on ExpertClick.com  Talkers – The Bible of Talk Radio and the News Talk Media: https://www.talkers.com/expert-guests/

El MAC mural in Los Angeles

Check out on a search engine some of the work of these guys, considered the top artists of street art… but not public art that is fine art?

  • Jean-Michel Basquiat (SAMO pronounced Same-Oh) …
  • Keith Haring
  • Shepard Fairey
  • Banksy
  • Os Gemeos (pronounced Oss Jaymeos)
  • JR
  • Swoon
  • Invader
  • C215
  • ETAM
  • RONZO
  • DALeast
  • * Vhils (Portuguese, pronounced Vills) (Alexandre Farto)
  • Mentalgassi
  • Hyuro
  • Titi Freak (Hamilton Yokoda)
  • SpY
  • Laguna
  • Blu

My favorite mural artist has nothing to do with the above street artist’s motives, vibe or social comments. Kent Twitchell focuses on depicting public art of American Cultural Icons. He believes in patriotism, putting God first in our lives and in our country, his art is always legal, respectful, the highest quality and a gift to society. Check out http://www.kenttwitchell.org/murals/

We are preparing this mural for installation-

Scott M. Haskins 805 570 4140 mobile faclartdoc@gmail.com

What does it mean that this article is “ syndicated”?

When something is published, usually by a news source, and is made available through different venues for redistribution then it is said to be syndicated. Publications that are syndicated are usually considered of value as being from an expert, educational, new worthy or valuable for wide popular interest. See syndication page at the renowned publicity site: www.NewsReleaseWire.com/257635

This website’s syndication included:

1) Included in the ExpertClick Press Room as a ‘press release.’ (different than a ‘news release’)

2) Included in the ‘Speaker Bureau Platform Page.’

3) Shown on the front page of ExpertClick, in rotation with other most recent posts.

4) Shown in the ‘News Release Results page.’

5) Included on optimized for searches on all my topics of expertise.

6) Shown via RSS linked from the Press Room. (A specific way news is actively distributed within the industry)

7) Shown in the full RSS feed from ExpertCick. (Another, different specific way news is actively distributed within the industry)

8) Syndicated to LexisNexis.com As of 2006, the company had the world’s largest electronic database for legal and public-records related information, distributor of academic content and expert opinion.

Posted in FACL in the media, Murals | Tagged | 1 Comment

Graffiti Art, Street Art… Save It As Valuable Contemporary Art?

This blog post has been syndicated at ExpertClick.com Its a bit of a coup to get an article syndicated, and its certainly prestigious, as additional “proof” that the info and the author are considered far and wide authoritative and an expert in the field. This article was syndicated for USA national redistribution. What does it mean that this article is “ syndicated”? See end of article for explanation. So, enjoy and trust our content!!

Our lab just finished cleaning up the graffiti vandalism defacing a heartfelt public work of art mural painted in 1987 by Russell Carlton, The #BlueMoonTrilogy. The mural was dedicated to the life saving and disease battling efforts of the AIDS Project Los Angeles in 1988 with a bronze plaque embedded into the mural… and still, though the mural was an emotional icon to saving lives, it was defaced with no respect.

Upon returning to our art conservation laboratory, we were honored by the visit of an international celebrity…

It seems funny to me, that the same spray paint applied illegally can be considered and esteemed so differently.

Graffiti art, a spray-painted image is, at least briefly, free for everyone to behold… until somebody defaces it, or a property owner paints over it. Banksy’s public art reputation endures, first because its become valued by the public (not just in financial terms), partly because of a crazy variety of efforts to salvage the art.

When the artist visited San Francisco in 2010, his work popped up in various neighborhoods. One artist-collector, Brian Greif, had part of a wall, with Banksy’s rendering of the iconic rat, spray painted on the side of a redwood slat Victorian building on Haight Street. It would seem that he would be looking for personal gain… but oddly enough, for this piece of art that was theoretically free to be seen by the public, he seeks a museum that will share it with the public in perpetuity.

His intentions were motivated actually, due to the San Francisco law that graffiti must be removed within 24-48 hours and this image was going to be painted out… so, basically it would not-so-visible by the public.

When Banksy’s movie Exit Through the Gift Shop opened in San Francisco in 2010, he skipped the traditional interviews with local press and instead gifted the city with a handful of attention-getting illegal murals, painted in secret as is his wont. (Reportedly, he got permission for one of them from shop owners.) As usual, many were quickly defaced by less creative vandals, but one hard-to-reach painting, a couple of stories up in the Haight district, survived long enough for Greif to cut it off the wall.

And Greif did one better making a feature film entitled Saving Banksy about the drama of saving and authenticating the mural and then battling the media and the art establishment. Here’s a trailer… click on the photo.

Fine Art Conservation Laboratories helps to save mural by Banksy

Scott M. Haskins, Art Conservator (center) positions redwood slats of removed Banksy mural as he consults with Paul Schurch, Master Woodworker on a plan for mounting the mural to an aluminum honeycomb panel.

Mr. Greif’s effort contrasts with that of Stephan Keszler, an art dealer with a gallery in Southampton, N.Y., who excavates Banksy’s works from public sites and sells them for his own gain. Banksy (who has never revealed his identity) condemns such sales, as does Ben Eine, one of many street artists interviewed here. Mr. Eine says Mr. Keszler is regarded by such painters as “a shyster”; Mr. Keszler, who displayed a few Banksys at Art Miami in 2012, says he enhances Banksy’s reputation.

According to Brian Greif, the iconic rat that he saved, restored and mounted onto a moveable wall aluminum honeycomb panel has been to 35 cities in the last 3 years on display… its time for a check up at Fine Art Conservation Laboratories.

Scott M. Haskins, Virginia Panizzon
Art Conservators
805 564 3438 office
faclofficemanager@gmail.com

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What does it mean that this article is “ syndicated”?

When something is published, usually by a news source, and is made available through different venues for redistribution then it is said to be syndicated. Publications that are syndicated are usually considered of value as being from an expert, educational, new worthy or valuable for wide popular interest. See syndication page at the renowned publicity site: http://www.NewsReleaseWire.com/257091

This website’s syndication included:

1) Included in the ExpertClick Press Room as a ‘press release.’ (different than a ‘news release’)

2) Included in the ‘Speaker Bureau Platform Page.’

3) Shown on the front page of ExpertClick, in rotation with other most recent posts.

4) Shown in the ‘News Release Results page.’

5) Included on optimized for searches on all my topics of expertise.

6) Shown via RSS linked from the Press Room. (A specific way news is actively distributed within the industry)

7) Shown in the full RSS feed from ExpertCick. (Another, different specific way news is actively distributed within the industry)

8) Syndicated to LexisNexis.com As of 2006, the company had the world’s largest electronic database for legal and public-records related information, distributor of academic content and expert opinion.

As a result of this syndication, Talkers – The Bible of Talk Radio and the News Talk Media ( https://www.talkers.com/expert-guests/) was a lead for The Frankie Boyer Talk Radio Show, BizTalkRadio, Boston, Mass who interviewed Scott on June 16th. There are also media that have scheduled Scott for content.

#MuralRestoration #Banksy #SavingBanksy #BrianGreif  #ScottMHaskins #PaintingRestoration #StreetArtConservation #ArtConservation #ArtRestoration #PaintingConservation #MuralConservation

Posted in Consulation, In Lab, Murals | Tagged , | 1 Comment

An Interesting Personal Story About Where Baroque Music, French Blue Bloods and Vintage Paintings with Hurdy-Gurdys Lead Me.

If you’ve followed me even a little time you’ll know that I travel a lot to personally consult with people about art restoration projects on location and that our company picks up and delivers. All of this traveling around often results in meeting interesting people.

I think I’ve got a short story for you that will make you smile and maybe even raise your eyebrows and say wow! Yesterday, I was in Los Angeles consulting about matters connected to art conservation and painting restoration and I had the great pleasure of reconnecting with client and friend, world renown harpsichord restorer Curtis Berak (https://bit.ly/3z3gRrq). Even though many of the gorgeous instruments that he works on have exquisite painting on them, we’ve never worked together on the restoration of what looks like a type of piano. But the reason we connect is because he is passionate about an odd instrument loved by French aristocracy known in English as a hurdy-gurdy.

Curtis collects vintage paintings of French Blue Bloods with hurdy-gurdies. Here’s a quick video I made years ago during a visit to his amazing old-world-workshop and I had him talk about some research and discovery work he was doing: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7ltm5sJTChc (please give this interesting video a thumbs up and leave a comment!)

Yesterday I had the great pleasure of connecting with Timna, who I thought was a referred friend of Curtis with a pastel portrait painting with a hurdy-gurdy but was not only a friend but also an ex-partner. Everything about this visit to Timna’s house was fun.

Timna, along with Curtis, is passionate about Baroque art and music and French aristocracy. But not only that, she spices it up with a lifetime of time travel. First of all, she is insuppressibly positive, even joyful. Her parents were world traveling, world class, working archaeologists who dragged her around to experience ancient cultures. Among her youthful years of travel, she spent a significant time in Egypt as they dug and discovered the ancients and included her. It sounded like this happened about 50 years ago. Of course, all this international travel, submersion in ancient cultures, living in foreign lands with all their foods, music and arts, customs, smells, and cultural interactions mixed with her insuppressible personality was an elixir for… well, not your normal girl next door.

On the outside, her small, restored cottage reflects on the Depression era homes of San Pedro. Admitted enthusiastically into her house by the cute French bulldog, though, you time travel and are submerged into a warm, welcoming cottage of the 1700s packed with blue and white Delft ceramics, artwork, stone lined walls and open beamed ceilings, period antiques and yes, an exquisite harpsichord… that she painted herself! In fact she has been painting harpsichords for over 30 years.

This harpsichord is for sale.                                                                                                 If you are interested, give me a call and we’ll put you in touch.

Every tabletop has beautiful figurines and other period collectibles. Everything looks like the Dutch or French 1700s. But the items that blew me away, were the French aristocracy costumes, including the shoes! Timna bedazzled me with her amazing talents as a seamstress. These clothing items that she made, every stitch, are completely authentic and of a quality that Louis XIV King of France would have been happy to wear.

As Timna poured her hospitality and enthusiasm on us over tea and scones, listening to hers and Curtis’ adventures and stories made our short time fly by. But the fun thing I learned was that in years past, they would throw a Baroque dress up party where select friends would come over for dinner and live music, dress up in full costume and make up, all tailored and provided by Timna, and time travel for an evening, leaving our day’s concept of civilization behind.

With the promise that they will soon throw another Baroque evening party to which my wife and I will be invited, I reluctantly had to go in order to stay on my schedule with other clients later in the day. I am enriched by my fun visit and the hospitality and wonderful cultural warmth of these smart, positive minded, spiritually enthusiastic, unique, talented people.

My office manager says, every once in a while, that I should write down my adventures and put a book together. This is definitely the beginning of a story board for a page turning chapter.

Would you like us to come to see you at your location in Orange County and Beach Cities, the Inland Empire, Pasadena Area, Greater Los Angeles Area, Beverly Hills Area, San Fernando Valley, Las Vegas, Salt Lake City, Thousand Oaks Area to Ventura and Santa Barbara. Questions about something (not someone) you love? Call Scott M. Haskins and Virginia Panizzon Art Conservators, 805 564 3438 faclofficemanager@gmail.com

#artrestoration #PaintingRestoration #artconservation #HurdyGurdy #CurtisBerak @CurtisBerak @ScottMHaskins @FineArtConservationLaboratories #ScottMHaskins #BaroqueMusic

Posted in Consultations, In Lab, Painting on canvas, Professional activities | Tagged | 3 Comments

Understanding Disaster Risk for Digital Heritage and Memories

June 2, 2021

An ICCROM virtual conference and training on preserving your digital memories. It may be a bit “corporate” or professional but the info should be good. Also, remember my publications, which are the most widely distributed and well known personal preservation manuals, with a more user friendly approach for protection of and recovery of physical heirlooms, collectibles, artwork, antiques, old books and photos, making archival scrapbooks tp protect photos etc. https://www.SaveYourStuff.com

How much of your life and memory exists digitally?

Join us for our webinar to hear from experts Kara Van Malssen, Brecht Declercq, AVP, FIAT/IFTA,Meemoo, Vlaams instituut voor het archief Sos Archivi ICCROM – conserving culture, promoting diversity International Association of Sound and Audiovisual Archives in the field of #digitalassetmanagement on how you can protect your digital information. before, during and after a disaster!

SOIMA, Archives at Risk, @IFLA, Indira Gandhi National Centre for the Arts

Register: https://iccrom-org.zoom.us/…/WN_L5rxlaCqROyrFgSRuW5BfA

In 2012, Hurricane Sandy caused multiple fatalities and more than 6 million homes and businesses experienced prolonged power outages, resulting in billions of dollars of losses in the form of digital assets.

Equally alarming is that 60% of small- and medium-sized businesses experienced a loss or theft of sensitive data in the last 12 months, and the cost of IT downtime was $700 billion in 2015. Disasters such as these result in significant losses of digital assets, which also includes digital heritage.

This webinar will promote a better understanding of disaster risk for digital heritage. Noted speakers from the fields of heritage risk reduction, archives, and digital asset management will share their experiences and expertise, and discuss how to prevent large-scale disruption and significant data loss.

Our aim is to build ground for a lively discussion by using interactive features such as live polls and a Q&A format.

To be held on Jun 7, 2021 04:00 PM in Rome Time (9 hours earlier than California or PDT) Attend it here, on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tXkK_kciD50

Ripped by a dog in transit.

Also, consider that in a disaster, will you have prepared your pet to be safe and sane? This may have a DIRECT EFFECT on your ability to save heirlooms, keepsakes etc! Practical tips to protect and save loved house pets in emergency situations along with tips for original family heirlooms, memorabilia and collectibles so they won’t be damaged. House pets and heirlooms don’t mix… and are not usually insured if there is a disaster… yet, they are your most heartfelt treasured possessions! https://www.ProtectYourPetGuidebook.com

Preventable damage seems like a disaster…

Why have Disaster Response Services

from Fine Art Conservation Laboratories

help you save, protect and restore your art related contents?

A Summary of Benefits – Added Value

We are different than any other disaster response clean-up company vendor. Our art conservation professionalism gives you peace of mind – during the clean up and afterwards. We are experienced in expanding our resources to meet your project needs (efficiency), whether we are helping you with a few cherished items or storage rooms full of treasures.

  • Only collection-care trained personnel handle your items
  • Extra square footage for safe handling, storage and rotation of inventory
  • Dedicated Project Manager to your project in order to maintain smooth running organization and attention to detail. You will not just be a project number.
  • Trained Dispatch and Logistics Coordinator to handle packing, shipping, storage, art movement (works under Project Manager)
  • Access to our art storage facility for you to view work (high security but easy access for you)
  • Secured storage of all items associated with full time functioning art conservation lab.
  • Active temperature control and passive humidity control of all storage and work areas.
  • Only qualified and trained personnel vetted by FACL (incl. subcontractors) will be part of the team. Resumes of all team members can be submitted. This assurance will be important for credibility of “collection care” (clean up) quality.
  • Project overview (included) documentation of contract work outlining, generally, all processes and materials used.
  • As internationally renown expert and author of the Save Your Stuff series, we are your experts you can trust to implement standards of excellence in saving and protecting your collectibles.
  • Put them under contract to use our paid expert witness services rather than as an unpaid sequestered witness

Before and After Conservation of vintage oil painting of the Santa Cruz Mission by Henry Chapman Ford after massive water damage.

We Protect The Re-Sale Potential of Valuable Art Items

  • FACL’s art conservation professional credibility can help document the need for “collection care maintenance” (a benefit) and not characterize the contract as being a “RESTORATION” (liability) for clients. This strategy (for resale) will help preserve value.
  • FACL will certify that all work is done to Library of Congress archival quality standards. (See copy of certificate, generated in-house).

Questions?

Call Scott M. Haskins or Virginia Panizzon, Art Conservators

805 564 3438 faclofficemanager@gmail.com

 

 

Posted in Consultations, Disaster/Emergency Response, In Lab, Insurance, Painting on canvas, Professional activities, Publications, Saving Public Art | Tagged | Comments Off on Understanding Disaster Risk for Digital Heritage and Memories

Oil Painting Restoration in Salt Lake City – a famous art dealer gives his trusted source 

By Khola Malik, Guest Blogger

This article has been syndicated at www.NewsReleaseWire.com/256479 What does it mean to be syndicated? See end of article.

Cracked oil paint layers, dull or faded colors, yellowed varnish, tears, scratches, and holes in old oil paintings often make people think that its too old to fix or deal with. Yet, it is exactly those kinds of problems that an art dealer has repaired all the time to restore the decorative appeal of even the finest art pieces on their walls. Even the best art gets dinged, banged up in moving, ripped, scratched by a collision with the house pet. All efforts and processes of PROPERLY restoring oil and acrylic paintings are not equal as veteran art dealer Anthony Christensen, the founder of Anthony’s Antiques and Fine Art operating in Salt Lake City, shares… and this is a BIG share! Tony has been in business for many decades and knows all about the good, the bad and the ugly of art restorers.

You shouldn’t and can’t, successfully, try DIYs at home to restore these delicate masterpieces, if you want to maintain the art’s value, historic authenticity and original look. Don’t do brain surgery on yourself and don’t try and restore valuable or historic art! The most effective idea is to opt for a wonderful professional art conservation business like Fine Art Conservation Laboratories, as Tony relates in this video:

All the people at Anthony’s Antiques and Fine Art will relate to you that FACL’s skills, business sense and door to door service is all part of their service as the best conservators anywhere in the Western United States and many feel nationwide. Tony’s business of art and antiques and has been working with FACL for around 15 to 20 years.

On a visit to the Springville Museum of Art with Dr. Verne Swanson, Anthony glanced at a perfect looking painting that was previously in a terrible condition. He was shocked at the finesse, flawlessness and excellence of the restoration work of removing the cracks and cleaning the painting. He immediately inquired about the art restorer who did the work and the museum director referred him Scott M. Haskins and his team.

c. 1920 Crashing Harmony by Paul Lauritz hung in the office of the director for the Springville Museum of Art

In the video he recalls his first introduction with Scott Haskins and his professional lab and states that he has always had a pleasant experience working with these dedicated professionals since then.

Anthony is often presented oil paintings from people wanting to sell beat up neglected, but nice oil paintings that look like they’ve been abandoned. Their art gallery brings them to life and preserves them for generations to come. While telling the story of his meeting with the museum director and while talking about the wonderful works of art they have in their galleries, he specifically referred to an amazing 19th century French painting of a woman with a parrot by Emil Villa and tells that he and his team are always in search of unparalleled quality art pieces. He also mentions that 120-year-old paintings of this sort are often found in what seems like unfixable condition. But, thankfully, Scott Haskins and associates at Fine Art Conservation Laboratories are skilled enough to know what needs to be done.

At the fine art and antique gallery, they are finicky to the extent that they pay attention to even the tiniest of the details. They want the best skills and the latest techniques of the restorers to bring the best out of the artwork to be restored. The final look of the painting is good enough to deceive the uneducated viewer’s eye because it looks as new as if it was painted yesterday but it is super important that vintage art maintains its vintage looks and original integrity. Minor details matter a lot for a person who deals in art and antiques.

According to Anthony’s Antiques and Fine Art in Salt Lake City and The Springville Museum of Art there is no need to hesitate; You can put your trust in the professional painting conservation team at Fine Art Conservation Laboratories and its exemplary services. Anthony takes pride in endorsing these art conservation professionals who have become valued friends. He considers it a privilege and lucky to have the opportunity to work with such a competent and likable professional as Scott Haskins.

For further confirmation, subscribe to Scott M. Haskins’ YouTube channel, view their amazing transformational videos and testimonials, and take advantage of the opportunity to be on Scott’s list of people to visit on his next visit to Utah. He will visit you at your location to discuss your questions and examine your art at no charge.  For questions, call FACL 805 564 3438 or faclofficemanager@gmail.com

What does it mean that this article is “ syndicated”?

When something is published, usually by a news source, and is made available through different venues for redistribution then it is said to be syndicated. Publications that are syndicated are usually considered of value as being from an expert, educational, new worthy or valuable for wide popular interest. See syndication page at the renowned publicity site: www.NewsReleaseWire.com

This website’s syndication included:

1) Included in the ExpertClick Press Room as a ‘press release.’ (different than a ‘news release’)

2) Included in the ‘Speaker Bureau Platform Page.’

3) Shown on the front page of ExpertClick, in rotation with other most recent posts.

4) Shown in the ‘News Release Results page.’

5) Included on optimized for searches on all my topics of expertise.

6) Shown via RSS linked from the Press Room. (A specific way news is actively distributed within the industry)

7) Shown in the full RSS feed from ExpertCick. (Another, different specific way news is actively distributed within the industry)

8) Syndicated to LexisNexis.com As of 2006, the company had the world’s largest electronic database for legal and public-records related information, distributor of academic content and expert opinion.

 

Posted in Consultations, Testimonials | Tagged | Comments Off on Oil Painting Restoration in Salt Lake City – a famous art dealer gives his trusted source 

WPA historic mural restoration expert Scott M. Haskins is interviewed by Sirius FM 143 national talk radio Julie Rose

This article has been syndicated at www.NewsReleaseWire.com/256244 What does it mean to be syndicated? See end of article.

The recent international attention of the finding, saving and conservation of the mural painted during the Depression Era for the Richmond California Post Office as WPA sponsored art has been noticed by radio and webinar interviewers throughout the United States and also in the UK. Perhaps it was because Victor Arnautoff was the artistic director for the murals in the Coit Tower in San Francisco and was a protege’ of renown artist Diego Rivera?  Perhaps it was the story of lost federal treasured art that was found again, cared for, preserved, restored and redisplayed for the public?

Well, that’s a “feel good” story that’s hard to pass off as “fake news.” Its kind of a breath of fresh air. The Sirius FM 143 20 minute interview by Julie Rose is here: https://www.byuradio.org/f8b77d13-1853-4966-891e-380c381804eb

Interviewer, Julie Rose

During a remodel of the “old post office” lobby, the 1941  6′ 6″ X 13’4″ historical WPA mural of “Richmond Industrial City” depicting prominent people and places in Richmond… was not considered, at the time, so historically important… and the artist, Victor Arnautoff was a prominent figure in New Deal art projects, a national federal program and a protégé of Diego Rivera!

Juliann Stephenson and Virginia Panizzon work on the mural restoration treatments

Out of sight out of mind, it languished forgotten in the basement for decades. Then, in 2014, Executive Director, Melinda McCrary at the Richmond Museum of History and Culture learned that a mural had once graced the post office lobby. She took charge in the hunt for this important large painting that had been “lost” and her search lead her to the janitor for the post office and they found a huge triangular crate in an unlit room, the label clearly identifying it as the missing mural. Besides poor handling in storage, flooding in the basement had to be dealt with! When the crate was finally opened, there was a collective sigh of relief when it was realized that even though there was a water stain on the outside of the crate, the mural roll appeared unaffected.

Even though getting the USPS authorities to take action was difficult,  there was no question at the Richmond Museum of History and Culture that the City’s heritage was documented and that this mural was a legacy of valuable public art.

Scott M. Haskins and Fine Art Conservation Laboratories, the art conservation firm gave two webinars sponsored by the Richmond Museum to rally the troops and support for the restoration of the mural. Not only did the community learn about the interesting aspects of the mural’s history and restoration but there was also presented  super interesting educational presentations on what attendees can do on their own to “save their stuff,” or preserve collectibles, heirlooms and family heritage at home or the office. Mr. Haskins is a world renown author of several books on this subject and makes it a lot of fun.

“This is a compelling work that captures the diversity of Richmond, a blue collar community,” says Melinda McCrary, the Museum’s Executive Director. “A wide range of occupations, ethnicities and scenery demonstrate what life was like in those days. Richmond was a working-class American community. It’s a celebration of life that was especially created for this community.”

“When Arnautoff, of Russian origin, painted the mural, he was one of the most prominent and influential members of San Francisco’s art community. Between 1932 and 1942, he completed 11public murals, the best known of which is City Life (1934) at Coit Tower in San Francisco. The Richmond Post Office mural was Arnautoff’s last mural of this size and the first time since Coit Tower that he chose to depict a mix of city people going about their daily tasks. His mural presents life in Richmond as of 1941-when America was on the brink of WWII.”

Restoring an Art Treasure: Richmond Industrial City Mural

Fine Art Conservation Laboratories was chosen as the “A” team. All of the mural conservation treatments are done with the idea that the mural will last generations into the future. When a paint company tells you about their best quality of paint, they mean it will last 10 years. We think in terms of generations, a century. Everything we do has a long-term future in mind,” says Haskins.

He’s careful to point out that they (the art conservators) are not artists and they don’t do anything creative. What they do is painstaking labor that requires some detective work to determine how and why the original materials used in the painting fall apart and how they respond to preservation treatments. “The art conservation process involves knowing how the artwork reacts to the environment.” Haskins and his team were trained decades ago in Italy and an impressive history of experience restoring treasured artwork and murals here in the US.

He points out that the government’s goal in funding art like Arnautoff’s was to
establish a legacy. “It was meant to be the artistic imprint on our community,” he says. “From a social conscience point of view, it is definitely worth saving.” Haskins shares Melinda McCrary’s commitment to preserving the mural, “The idea of preserving our heritage and understanding our legacy is very important to the community,” he says. “Richmond doesn’t have a famous cathedral but we do have things that prompt or “trigger” our memory. People tell stories that perpetuate the valor and importance of the times. And this mural is not just a decoration.”

Restoration of Richmond an Industrial City was completed in October 2020.

Testimonial by Executive Director of the Museum, Melinda McCrary for WPA Mural Conservation and Reinstallation https://youtu.be/d0vqElVqgpA

Testimonials for other projects of the mural conservation services are on this playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL41D80C1C65FF2CE7

The video of the project is: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_4Bi0-8oZ6M

Call Scott M. Haskins for more information… or for a tour of the art conservation laboratory in Santa Barbara, CA. 805 564 3438 faclofficemanager@gmail.com

Call Melinda McCrary as the Richmond Museum contact for more information: 510 235 7387

International coverage of this project by The International Institute For Conservation: https://issuu.com/nic_iiconservation/docs/nic-magazine-apr-may-2021_issue-83_issuu/18?fbclid=IwAR1ybiG5BCTASdQeJx1PNIArqvL_FcenwnhAOwUUYKN8YnFDhGPV_OJdnSY

What does it mean that this article is “ syndicated”?

When something is published, usually by a news source, and is made available through different venues for redistribution then it is said to be syndicated. Publications that are syndicated are usually considered of value as being from an expert, educational, new worthy or valuable for wide popular interest. See syndication page at the renowned publicity site: www.NewsReleaseWire.com/256244

This website’s syndication included:

1) Included in the ExpertClick Press Room as a ‘press release.’ (different than a ‘news release’)

2) Included in the ‘Speaker Bureau Platform Page.’

3) Shown on the front page of ExpertClick, in rotation with other most recent posts.

4) Shown in the ‘News Release Results page.’

5) Included on optimized for searches on all my topics of expertise.

6) Shown via RSS linked from the Press Room. (A specific way news is actively distributed within the industry)

7) Shown in the full RSS feed from ExpertCick. (Another, different specific way news is actively distributed within the industry)

8) Syndicated to LexisNexis.com As of 2006, the company had the world’s largest electronic database for legal and public-records related information, distributor of academic content and expert opinion.

 

Posted in FACL in the media, Murals, Professional activities, Saving Public Art | Tagged | Comments Off on WPA historic mural restoration expert Scott M. Haskins is interviewed by Sirius FM 143 national talk radio Julie Rose

National Magazine Photo Shoot On Art Restoration

A nationally distributed-online and in-print magazine is featuring Fine Art Conservation Laboratories for the painting restoration of a high profile historical painting (which will, for the time, remain nameless… sorry). The photographer thought he would grab a couple of quick shots and be out of our hair in 30 minutes but was so stimulated by our lab, our processes and the projects that he morphed into a fashion photographer that couldn’t get enough shots over a 2 1/2 hour shooting session.

Photo by Mathew Scott, https://mathewscott.com

He was actually very entertaining as he expressed approval for the photo posing set ups and that we were able to follow his coaching. The editors initially said they wanted to take a couple of photographs and I think it turned into a couple of hundred.

I think you’ll find both the artwork and it’s story entertaining and interesting. When it’s appropriate and we get the approval we will let you know…

A different subject, we had a few nice testimonials that clients wanted to share on video. So, those will be coming up soon. Here is the link to a very nice lady relieved to have saved her precious wedding memory:

Want to chat about your questions on art storage services and painting conservation? Call 805 564 3438 or faclofficemanager@gmail.com Scott M. Haskins and Virginia Panizzon Art Conservators

What does it mean that this article is “ syndicated”?

When something is published, usually by a news source, and is made available through different venues for redistribution then it is said to be syndicated. Publications that are syndicated are usually considered of value as being from an expert, educational, new worthy or valuable for wide popular interest. See syndication page at the renowned publicity site: www.NewsReleaseWire.com/239643

This website’s syndication included:

1) Included in the ExpertClick Press Room as a ‘press release.’ (different than a ‘news release’)

2) Included in the ‘Speaker Bureau Platform Page.’

3) Shown on the front page of ExpertClick, in rotation with other most recent posts.

4) Shown in the ‘News Release Results page.’

5) Included on optimized for searches on all my topics of expertise.

6) Shown via RSS linked from the Press Room. (A specific way news is actively distributed within the industry)

7) Shown in the full RSS feed from ExpertCick. (Another, different specific way news is actively distributed within the industry)

8) Syndicated to LexisNexis.com As of 2006, the company had the world’s largest electronic database for legal and public-records related information, distributor of academic content and expert opinion.

This article has been syndicated at www.NewsReleaseWire.com/255621

Posted in FACL in the media, Saving Public Art | Tagged | 2 Comments