An Interesting Personal Story About Where Baroque Music, French Blue Bloods and Vintage Paintings with Hurdy-Gurdys Lead Me.

If you’ve followed me even a little time you’ll know that I travel a lot to personally consult with people about art restoration projects on location and that our company picks up and delivers. All of this traveling around often results in meeting interesting people.

I think I’ve got a short story for you that will make you smile and maybe even raise your eyebrows and say wow! Yesterday, I was in Los Angeles consulting about matters connected to art conservation and painting restoration and I had the great pleasure of reconnecting with client and friend, world renown harpsichord restorer Curtis Berak (https://bit.ly/3z3gRrq). Even though many of the gorgeous instruments that he works on have exquisite painting on them, we’ve never worked together on the restoration of what looks like a type of piano. But the reason we connect is because he is passionate about an odd instrument loved by French aristocracy known in English as a hurdy-gurdy.

Curtis collects vintage paintings of French Blue Bloods with hurdy-gurdies. Here’s a quick video I made years ago during a visit to his amazing old-world-workshop and I had him talk about some research and discovery work he was doing: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7ltm5sJTChc (please give this interesting video a thumbs up and leave a comment!)

Yesterday I had the great pleasure of connecting with Timna, who I thought was a referred friend of Curtis with a pastel portrait painting with a hurdy-gurdy but was not only a friend but also an ex-partner. Everything about this visit to Timna’s house was fun.

Timna, along with Curtis, is passionate about Baroque art and music and French aristocracy. But not only that, she spices it up with a lifetime of time travel. First of all, she is insuppressibly positive, even joyful. Her parents were world traveling, world class, working archaeologists who dragged her around to experience ancient cultures. Among her youthful years of travel, she spent a significant time in Egypt as they dug and discovered the ancients and included her. It sounded like this happened about 50 years ago. Of course, all this international travel, submersion in ancient cultures, living in foreign lands with all their foods, music and arts, customs, smells, and cultural interactions mixed with her insuppressible personality was an elixir for… well, not your normal girl next door.

On the outside, her small, restored cottage reflects on the Depression era homes of San Pedro. Admitted enthusiastically into her house by the cute French bulldog, though, you time travel and are submerged into a warm, welcoming cottage of the 1700s packed with blue and white Delft ceramics, artwork, stone lined walls and open beamed ceilings, period antiques and yes, an exquisite harpsichord… that she painted herself! In fact she has been painting harpsichords for over 30 years.

This harpsichord is for sale.                                                                                                 If you are interested, give me a call and we’ll put you in touch.

Every tabletop has beautiful figurines and other period collectibles. Everything looks like the Dutch or French 1700s. But the items that blew me away, were the French aristocracy costumes, including the shoes! Timna bedazzled me with her amazing talents as a seamstress. These clothing items that she made, every stitch, are completely authentic and of a quality that Louis XIV King of France would have been happy to wear.

As Timna poured her hospitality and enthusiasm on us over tea and scones, listening to hers and Curtis’ adventures and stories made our short time fly by. But the fun thing I learned was that in years past, they would throw a Baroque dress up party where select friends would come over for dinner and live music, dress up in full costume and make up, all tailored and provided by Timna, and time travel for an evening, leaving our day’s concept of civilization behind.

With the promise that they will soon throw another Baroque evening party to which my wife and I will be invited, I reluctantly had to go in order to stay on my schedule with other clients later in the day. I am enriched by my fun visit and the hospitality and wonderful cultural warmth of these smart, positive minded, spiritually enthusiastic, unique, talented people.

My office manager says, every once in a while, that I should write down my adventures and put a book together. This is definitely the beginning of a story board for a page turning chapter.

Would you like us to come to see you at your location in Orange County and Beach Cities, the Inland Empire, Pasadena Area, Greater Los Angeles Area, Beverly Hills Area, San Fernando Valley, Las Vegas, Salt Lake City, Thousand Oaks Area to Ventura and Santa Barbara. Questions about something (not someone) you love? Call Scott M. Haskins and Virginia Panizzon Art Conservators, 805 564 3438 faclofficemanager@gmail.com

#artrestoration #PaintingRestoration #artconservation #HurdyGurdy #CurtisBerak @CurtisBerak @ScottMHaskins @FineArtConservationLaboratories #ScottMHaskins #BaroqueMusic

Posted in Consultations, In Lab, Painting on canvas, Professional activities | Tagged | 3 Comments

Understanding Disaster Risk for Digital Heritage and Memories

June 2, 2021

An ICCROM virtual conference and training on preserving your digital memories. It may be a bit “corporate” or professional but the info should be good. Also, remember my publications, which are the most widely distributed and well known personal preservation manuals, with a more user friendly approach for protection of and recovery of physical heirlooms, collectibles, artwork, antiques, old books and photos, making archival scrapbooks tp protect photos etc. https://www.SaveYourStuff.com

How much of your life and memory exists digitally?

Join us for our webinar to hear from experts Kara Van Malssen, Brecht Declercq, AVP, FIAT/IFTA,Meemoo, Vlaams instituut voor het archief Sos Archivi ICCROM – conserving culture, promoting diversity International Association of Sound and Audiovisual Archives in the field of #digitalassetmanagement on how you can protect your digital information. before, during and after a disaster!

SOIMA, Archives at Risk, @IFLA, Indira Gandhi National Centre for the Arts

Register: https://iccrom-org.zoom.us/…/WN_L5rxlaCqROyrFgSRuW5BfA

In 2012, Hurricane Sandy caused multiple fatalities and more than 6 million homes and businesses experienced prolonged power outages, resulting in billions of dollars of losses in the form of digital assets.

Equally alarming is that 60% of small- and medium-sized businesses experienced a loss or theft of sensitive data in the last 12 months, and the cost of IT downtime was $700 billion in 2015. Disasters such as these result in significant losses of digital assets, which also includes digital heritage.

This webinar will promote a better understanding of disaster risk for digital heritage. Noted speakers from the fields of heritage risk reduction, archives, and digital asset management will share their experiences and expertise, and discuss how to prevent large-scale disruption and significant data loss.

Our aim is to build ground for a lively discussion by using interactive features such as live polls and a Q&A format.

To be held on Jun 7, 2021 04:00 PM in Rome Time (9 hours earlier than California or PDT) Attend it here, on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tXkK_kciD50

Ripped by a dog in transit.

Also, consider that in a disaster, will you have prepared your pet to be safe and sane? This may have a DIRECT EFFECT on your ability to save heirlooms, keepsakes etc! Practical tips to protect and save loved house pets in emergency situations along with tips for original family heirlooms, memorabilia and collectibles so they won’t be damaged. House pets and heirlooms don’t mix… and are not usually insured if there is a disaster… yet, they are your most heartfelt treasured possessions! https://www.ProtectYourPetGuidebook.com

Preventable damage seems like a disaster…

Why have Disaster Response Services

from Fine Art Conservation Laboratories

help you save, protect and restore your art related contents?

A Summary of Benefits – Added Value

We are different than any other disaster response clean-up company vendor. Our art conservation professionalism gives you peace of mind – during the clean up and afterwards. We are experienced in expanding our resources to meet your project needs (efficiency), whether we are helping you with a few cherished items or storage rooms full of treasures.

  • Only collection-care trained personnel handle your items
  • Extra square footage for safe handling, storage and rotation of inventory
  • Dedicated Project Manager to your project in order to maintain smooth running organization and attention to detail. You will not just be a project number.
  • Trained Dispatch and Logistics Coordinator to handle packing, shipping, storage, art movement (works under Project Manager)
  • Access to our art storage facility for you to view work (high security but easy access for you)
  • Secured storage of all items associated with full time functioning art conservation lab.
  • Active temperature control and passive humidity control of all storage and work areas.
  • Only qualified and trained personnel vetted by FACL (incl. subcontractors) will be part of the team. Resumes of all team members can be submitted. This assurance will be important for credibility of “collection care” (clean up) quality.
  • Project overview (included) documentation of contract work outlining, generally, all processes and materials used.
  • As internationally renown expert and author of the Save Your Stuff series, we are your experts you can trust to implement standards of excellence in saving and protecting your collectibles.
  • Put them under contract to use our paid expert witness services rather than as an unpaid sequestered witness

Before and After Conservation of vintage oil painting of the Santa Cruz Mission by Henry Chapman Ford after massive water damage.

We Protect The Re-Sale Potential of Valuable Art Items

  • FACL’s art conservation professional credibility can help document the need for “collection care maintenance” (a benefit) and not characterize the contract as being a “RESTORATION” (liability) for clients. This strategy (for resale) will help preserve value.
  • FACL will certify that all work is done to Library of Congress archival quality standards. (See copy of certificate, generated in-house).

Questions?

Call Scott M. Haskins or Virginia Panizzon, Art Conservators

805 564 3438 faclofficemanager@gmail.com

 

 

Posted in Consultations, Disaster/Emergency Response, In Lab, Insurance, Painting on canvas, Professional activities, Publications, Saving Public Art | Tagged | Comments Off on Understanding Disaster Risk for Digital Heritage and Memories

Oil Painting Restoration in Salt Lake City – a famous art dealer gives his trusted source 

By Khola Malik, Guest Blogger

This article has been syndicated at www.NewsReleaseWire.com/256479 What does it mean to be syndicated? See end of article.

Cracked oil paint layers, dull or faded colors, yellowed varnish, tears, scratches, and holes in old oil paintings often make people think that its too old to fix or deal with. Yet, it is exactly those kinds of problems that an art dealer has repaired all the time to restore the decorative appeal of even the finest art pieces on their walls. Even the best art gets dinged, banged up in moving, ripped, scratched by a collision with the house pet. All efforts and processes of PROPERLY restoring oil and acrylic paintings are not equal as veteran art dealer Anthony Christensen, the founder of Anthony’s Antiques and Fine Art operating in Salt Lake City, shares… and this is a BIG share! Tony has been in business for many decades and knows all about the good, the bad and the ugly of art restorers.

You shouldn’t and can’t, successfully, try DIYs at home to restore these delicate masterpieces, if you want to maintain the art’s value, historic authenticity and original look. Don’t do brain surgery on yourself and don’t try and restore valuable or historic art! The most effective idea is to opt for a wonderful professional art conservation business like Fine Art Conservation Laboratories, as Tony relates in this video:

All the people at Anthony’s Antiques and Fine Art will relate to you that FACL’s skills, business sense and door to door service is all part of their service as the best conservators anywhere in the Western United States and many feel nationwide. Tony’s business of art and antiques and has been working with FACL for around 15 to 20 years.

On a visit to the Springville Museum of Art with Dr. Verne Swanson, Anthony glanced at a perfect looking painting that was previously in a terrible condition. He was shocked at the finesse, flawlessness and excellence of the restoration work of removing the cracks and cleaning the painting. He immediately inquired about the art restorer who did the work and the museum director referred him Scott M. Haskins and his team.

c. 1920 Crashing Harmony by Paul Lauritz hung in the office of the director for the Springville Museum of Art

In the video he recalls his first introduction with Scott Haskins and his professional lab and states that he has always had a pleasant experience working with these dedicated professionals since then.

Anthony is often presented oil paintings from people wanting to sell beat up neglected, but nice oil paintings that look like they’ve been abandoned. Their art gallery brings them to life and preserves them for generations to come. While telling the story of his meeting with the museum director and while talking about the wonderful works of art they have in their galleries, he specifically referred to an amazing 19th century French painting of a woman with a parrot by Emil Villa and tells that he and his team are always in search of unparalleled quality art pieces. He also mentions that 120-year-old paintings of this sort are often found in what seems like unfixable condition. But, thankfully, Scott Haskins and associates at Fine Art Conservation Laboratories are skilled enough to know what needs to be done.

At the fine art and antique gallery, they are finicky to the extent that they pay attention to even the tiniest of the details. They want the best skills and the latest techniques of the restorers to bring the best out of the artwork to be restored. The final look of the painting is good enough to deceive the uneducated viewer’s eye because it looks as new as if it was painted yesterday but it is super important that vintage art maintains its vintage looks and original integrity. Minor details matter a lot for a person who deals in art and antiques.

According to Anthony’s Antiques and Fine Art in Salt Lake City and The Springville Museum of Art there is no need to hesitate; You can put your trust in the professional painting conservation team at Fine Art Conservation Laboratories and its exemplary services. Anthony takes pride in endorsing these art conservation professionals who have become valued friends. He considers it a privilege and lucky to have the opportunity to work with such a competent and likable professional as Scott Haskins.

For further confirmation, subscribe to Scott M. Haskins’ YouTube channel, view their amazing transformational videos and testimonials, and take advantage of the opportunity to be on Scott’s list of people to visit on his next visit to Utah. He will visit you at your location to discuss your questions and examine your art at no charge.  For questions, call FACL 805 564 3438 or faclofficemanager@gmail.com

What does it mean that this article is “ syndicated”?

When something is published, usually by a news source, and is made available through different venues for redistribution then it is said to be syndicated. Publications that are syndicated are usually considered of value as being from an expert, educational, new worthy or valuable for wide popular interest. See syndication page at the renowned publicity site: www.NewsReleaseWire.com

This website’s syndication included:

1) Included in the ExpertClick Press Room as a ‘press release.’ (different than a ‘news release’)

2) Included in the ‘Speaker Bureau Platform Page.’

3) Shown on the front page of ExpertClick, in rotation with other most recent posts.

4) Shown in the ‘News Release Results page.’

5) Included on optimized for searches on all my topics of expertise.

6) Shown via RSS linked from the Press Room. (A specific way news is actively distributed within the industry)

7) Shown in the full RSS feed from ExpertCick. (Another, different specific way news is actively distributed within the industry)

8) Syndicated to LexisNexis.com As of 2006, the company had the world’s largest electronic database for legal and public-records related information, distributor of academic content and expert opinion.

 

Posted in Consultations, Testimonials | Tagged | Comments Off on Oil Painting Restoration in Salt Lake City – a famous art dealer gives his trusted source 

WPA historic mural restoration expert Scott M. Haskins is interviewed by Sirius FM 143 national talk radio Julie Rose

This article has been syndicated at www.NewsReleaseWire.com/256244 What does it mean to be syndicated? See end of article.

The recent international attention of the finding, saving and conservation of the mural painted during the Depression Era for the Richmond California Post Office as WPA sponsored art has been noticed by radio and webinar interviewers throughout the United States and also in the UK. Perhaps it was because Victor Arnautoff was the artistic director for the murals in the Coit Tower in San Francisco and was a protege’ of renown artist Diego Rivera?  Perhaps it was the story of lost federal treasured art that was found again, cared for, preserved, restored and redisplayed for the public?

Well, that’s a “feel good” story that’s hard to pass off as “fake news.” Its kind of a breath of fresh air. The Sirius FM 143 20 minute interview by Julie Rose is here: https://www.byuradio.org/f8b77d13-1853-4966-891e-380c381804eb

Interviewer, Julie Rose

During a remodel of the “old post office” lobby, the 1941  6′ 6″ X 13’4″ historical WPA mural of “Richmond Industrial City” depicting prominent people and places in Richmond… was not considered, at the time, so historically important… and the artist, Victor Arnautoff was a prominent figure in New Deal art projects, a national federal program and a protégé of Diego Rivera!

Juliann Stephenson and Virginia Panizzon work on the mural restoration treatments

Out of sight out of mind, it languished forgotten in the basement for decades. Then, in 2014, Executive Director, Melinda McCrary at the Richmond Museum of History and Culture learned that a mural had once graced the post office lobby. She took charge in the hunt for this important large painting that had been “lost” and her search lead her to the janitor for the post office and they found a huge triangular crate in an unlit room, the label clearly identifying it as the missing mural. Besides poor handling in storage, flooding in the basement had to be dealt with! When the crate was finally opened, there was a collective sigh of relief when it was realized that even though there was a water stain on the outside of the crate, the mural roll appeared unaffected.

Even though getting the USPS authorities to take action was difficult,  there was no question at the Richmond Museum of History and Culture that the City’s heritage was documented and that this mural was a legacy of valuable public art.

Scott M. Haskins and Fine Art Conservation Laboratories, the art conservation firm gave two webinars sponsored by the Richmond Museum to rally the troops and support for the restoration of the mural. Not only did the community learn about the interesting aspects of the mural’s history and restoration but there was also presented  super interesting educational presentations on what attendees can do on their own to “save their stuff,” or preserve collectibles, heirlooms and family heritage at home or the office. Mr. Haskins is a world renown author of several books on this subject and makes it a lot of fun.

“This is a compelling work that captures the diversity of Richmond, a blue collar community,” says Melinda McCrary, the Museum’s Executive Director. “A wide range of occupations, ethnicities and scenery demonstrate what life was like in those days. Richmond was a working-class American community. It’s a celebration of life that was especially created for this community.”

“When Arnautoff, of Russian origin, painted the mural, he was one of the most prominent and influential members of San Francisco’s art community. Between 1932 and 1942, he completed 11public murals, the best known of which is City Life (1934) at Coit Tower in San Francisco. The Richmond Post Office mural was Arnautoff’s last mural of this size and the first time since Coit Tower that he chose to depict a mix of city people going about their daily tasks. His mural presents life in Richmond as of 1941-when America was on the brink of WWII.”

Restoring an Art Treasure: Richmond Industrial City Mural

Fine Art Conservation Laboratories was chosen as the “A” team. All of the mural conservation treatments are done with the idea that the mural will last generations into the future. When a paint company tells you about their best quality of paint, they mean it will last 10 years. We think in terms of generations, a century. Everything we do has a long-term future in mind,” says Haskins.

He’s careful to point out that they (the art conservators) are not artists and they don’t do anything creative. What they do is painstaking labor that requires some detective work to determine how and why the original materials used in the painting fall apart and how they respond to preservation treatments. “The art conservation process involves knowing how the artwork reacts to the environment.” Haskins and his team were trained decades ago in Italy and an impressive history of experience restoring treasured artwork and murals here in the US.

He points out that the government’s goal in funding art like Arnautoff’s was to
establish a legacy. “It was meant to be the artistic imprint on our community,” he says. “From a social conscience point of view, it is definitely worth saving.” Haskins shares Melinda McCrary’s commitment to preserving the mural, “The idea of preserving our heritage and understanding our legacy is very important to the community,” he says. “Richmond doesn’t have a famous cathedral but we do have things that prompt or “trigger” our memory. People tell stories that perpetuate the valor and importance of the times. And this mural is not just a decoration.”

Restoration of Richmond an Industrial City was completed in October 2020.

Testimonial by Executive Director of the Museum, Melinda McCrary for WPA Mural Conservation and Reinstallation https://youtu.be/d0vqElVqgpA

Testimonials for other projects of the mural conservation services are on this playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL41D80C1C65FF2CE7

The video of the project is: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_4Bi0-8oZ6M

Call Scott M. Haskins for more information… or for a tour of the art conservation laboratory in Santa Barbara, CA. 805 564 3438 faclofficemanager@gmail.com

Call Melinda McCrary as the Richmond Museum contact for more information: 510 235 7387

International coverage of this project by The International Institute For Conservation: https://issuu.com/nic_iiconservation/docs/nic-magazine-apr-may-2021_issue-83_issuu/18?fbclid=IwAR1ybiG5BCTASdQeJx1PNIArqvL_FcenwnhAOwUUYKN8YnFDhGPV_OJdnSY

What does it mean that this article is “ syndicated”?

When something is published, usually by a news source, and is made available through different venues for redistribution then it is said to be syndicated. Publications that are syndicated are usually considered of value as being from an expert, educational, new worthy or valuable for wide popular interest. See syndication page at the renowned publicity site: www.NewsReleaseWire.com/256244

This website’s syndication included:

1) Included in the ExpertClick Press Room as a ‘press release.’ (different than a ‘news release’)

2) Included in the ‘Speaker Bureau Platform Page.’

3) Shown on the front page of ExpertClick, in rotation with other most recent posts.

4) Shown in the ‘News Release Results page.’

5) Included on optimized for searches on all my topics of expertise.

6) Shown via RSS linked from the Press Room. (A specific way news is actively distributed within the industry)

7) Shown in the full RSS feed from ExpertCick. (Another, different specific way news is actively distributed within the industry)

8) Syndicated to LexisNexis.com As of 2006, the company had the world’s largest electronic database for legal and public-records related information, distributor of academic content and expert opinion.

 

Posted in FACL in the media, Murals, Professional activities, Saving Public Art | Tagged | Comments Off on WPA historic mural restoration expert Scott M. Haskins is interviewed by Sirius FM 143 national talk radio Julie Rose

National Magazine Photo Shoot On Art Restoration

A nationally distributed-online and in-print magazine is featuring Fine Art Conservation Laboratories for the painting restoration of a high profile historical painting (which will, for the time, remain nameless… sorry). The photographer thought he would grab a couple of quick shots and be out of our hair in 30 minutes but was so stimulated by our lab, our processes and the projects that he morphed into a fashion photographer that couldn’t get enough shots over a 2 1/2 hour shooting session.

Photo by Mathew Scott, https://mathewscott.com

He was actually very entertaining as he expressed approval for the photo posing set ups and that we were able to follow his coaching. The editors initially said they wanted to take a couple of photographs and I think it turned into a couple of hundred.

I think you’ll find both the artwork and it’s story entertaining and interesting. When it’s appropriate and we get the approval we will let you know…

A different subject, we had a few nice testimonials that clients wanted to share on video. So, those will be coming up soon. Here is the link to a very nice lady relieved to have saved her precious wedding memory:

Want to chat about your questions on art storage services and painting conservation? Call 805 564 3438 or faclofficemanager@gmail.com Scott M. Haskins and Virginia Panizzon Art Conservators

What does it mean that this article is “ syndicated”?

When something is published, usually by a news source, and is made available through different venues for redistribution then it is said to be syndicated. Publications that are syndicated are usually considered of value as being from an expert, educational, new worthy or valuable for wide popular interest. See syndication page at the renowned publicity site: www.NewsReleaseWire.com/239643

This website’s syndication included:

1) Included in the ExpertClick Press Room as a ‘press release.’ (different than a ‘news release’)

2) Included in the ‘Speaker Bureau Platform Page.’

3) Shown on the front page of ExpertClick, in rotation with other most recent posts.

4) Shown in the ‘News Release Results page.’

5) Included on optimized for searches on all my topics of expertise.

6) Shown via RSS linked from the Press Room. (A specific way news is actively distributed within the industry)

7) Shown in the full RSS feed from ExpertCick. (Another, different specific way news is actively distributed within the industry)

8) Syndicated to LexisNexis.com As of 2006, the company had the world’s largest electronic database for legal and public-records related information, distributor of academic content and expert opinion.

This article has been syndicated at www.NewsReleaseWire.com/255621

Posted in FACL in the media, Saving Public Art | Tagged | 2 Comments

Garda in USA

Cultural event about Garda Lake in the USA

A very special invite from Scott M. Haskins and Fine Art Conservation Laboratories to have, as our guest, an authentic Northern Italian lunch and live Garda Lake Italian cultural webinar THIS SATURDAY 10:30am – 12:00pm in Laguna Niguel (weird hours, yes, we know but we are coordinating with the live webinar from Italy). Nothing to buy, just come and enjoy as our guest. Reservations are very limited and required for this very unique and enjoyable event!!! Come taste typical recipes from Garda Lake at Bistro K, an exceptional Northern Italian restaurant in Laguna Niguel, and discover new (just made public) or little-known cultural secrets and treasures in the live webinar transmission from Italy’s Garda Lake. Scott will comment, as a professional who has been on-site, about these cultural gems.

Merchants from Lonato del Garda, on Garda Lake next to Desenzano and Sirmione,

have sent food stuffs to be served at Bistro K during the webinar

 

If you love the North Italian vibe, food, culture and the Garda Lake Region, then you will not want to miss this very savory, unique, live, cultural event

designed to stimulate your wanderlust senses.

This Sat. April 17th, 2021 at Bistro K

30100 Town Center Dr.

Laguna Niguel, CA 92677,

(949) 495-9101

katia@thebistrok.com

http://www.gobistrok.com/

Reservations Required

Reservations Very Limited

Call NOW

Complimentary Menu Served at Bistro K

White mushroom salad with Lonato/Garda Lake olive oil and lemon

Risotto w/Lonato Saffron accompanied w/ Osso Buco

Cold Zabaglione w/berries

Call to attend NOW

 

30100 Town Center Dr.

Laguna Niguel, CA 92677,

(949) 495-9101

katia@thebistrok.com

http://www.gobistrok.com/

Sponsored, supported, promoted and transmitted by the town of Lonato del GardaLonato del Garda Small Business Adminstration, the Merchant Association of Lonato del Garda, Italian Lake Garda tourism dept., The Madonna del Corlo Foundation (Mural Conservation Project),  The Archaeological Association La Polada, agriculture dept., wine industry, L.A.CU.S regional cultural office, The Italian Cultural Center di San Diego, Il Ristorante Pizzeria La Campagnola (in Lonato del Garda), L’Azienda Agricola “La Marchesa, L’Azienda Agricola Winery Saottini, Restaurant Bistro K (Laguna Niguel, CA), Disvelarte Restoration and Conservation Firm (Brescia, Italy),

Fine Art Conservation Laboratories (FACL, Inc. in Santa Barbara, CA) a consultant and team member for the Mural Conservation Project of Madonna del Corlo Community Center will be speaking live at Bistro K about some amazing mural masterpieces in the process of being discovered and still unknown… even to the locals!!

Posted in Consultations, Murals, Travel | Tagged | 1 Comment

Lost Post Office WPA Mural Found, Restored, and Installed in San Francisco Bay Museum

Just published in the prestigious newsletter for the International Institute for Conservation in London, “Lost WPA Mural: Found, Conserved, and Installed in San Francisco Bay Museum.”

Scroll to page 18 for the article:
https://www.iiconservation.org/…/journal/2021/b2021_2.pdf

Richmond Industrial City, 1941 is a WPA mural by Russian immigrant Victor Arnautoff, who was also the past project director for the 1934 Coit Tower mural project and protégé of international superstar artist, Diego Rivera. 

Juliann Stephenson and Virginia Panizzon work on the mural restoration treatments

Richmond Museum of History and Culture Saves Lost Historic Mural

The mural  hung in a post office from 1941 to 1976. After it was taken off the wall while the building was renovated, it was put in a crate and left in a basement. It took four years to raise $45,000 dollars to restore the canvas. KQED Reporter, Raquel Maria Dillon,

KQED Reporter, Raquel Maria Dillon, is quoted on the station’s website as promoting that the Richmond Museum let languish for 4 years, and was considered lost in a basement, a valuable and historic WPA mural by the renowned Art Director for the installation of the Ribera murals in Coit Tower Victor Arnautoff.

That was not the story at all. And its puzzling too. Because KQED says it is a proud member of NPR and PBS. But how could they be a proud member of these news sources and also be so sloppy about covering the preservation and restoration work done for the mural by a conservation team which is a noted and awarded PBS featured quality company?

Fine Art Conservation Laboratories is honored to have been a part of this worthwhile community effort to save their heritage and retell the stories important to their history.

Call to discuss any questions about your art you may have: Scott M. Haskins and Virginia Panizzon Art Conservators 805 564 3438 FACLOfficeManager@gmail.com

Posted in FACL in the media, Historic Buildings - Construction Sites, Murals | Tagged , | 2 Comments

A 2,000 Year Old Greek Geared Calculator For Astronomy

This is not an article about art conservation but the incredible technology known and produced anciently was irresistible to me for posting. I hope you find this a wondrous evidence of the human mind… especially in ancient times.

I had a very busy morning planned but this posting by Craig Deller on the Facebook page of The Art of the Conservator grabbed me and highjacked my schedule. I couldn’t tear myself away from this wonderful quality video of the inconceivable 2,000 year old Greek technology and manufacturing wonder. Wow, its incredible how much we do not know about past civilizations and their capabilities. I’m bedazzled.

https://vimeo.com/518734183?fbclid=IwAR2ZoELQhhZvXS3paAvuvL8g-bHMavK7xGshn6udsKFKGxVrGti6MW8S9X4The research, technology and collaboration of specialized knowledge to update us on the unraveling of the corroded puzzle was put together very nicely in this video.

The UCL Antikythera Research Team struggle to solve the front of the Antikythera Mechanism—a fragmentary ancient Greek astronomical calculator—revealing a dazzling display of the ancient Greek Cosmos. The team represented so many academic disciplines, that you found how Parmenides approximation method applied and the nested axles. I really hope you find a method the Greeks could have used to machine those tubes. But I don’t think that is such a mystery: A comment by Adam Wojcik at 25:31 “If you’ve got no lathe in Ancient Greece…”

Why would you assume that? Given the complexity of the gearing and the engineering knowledge required to come up with it in the first place… Why would you presume the Ancient Greeks incapable of imagining a machine as simple as a lathe?? A potter’s wheel is little more than a foot powered lathe. If you can understand how a gear works, you can definitely figure out how to cut with a lathe-like machine. So, as soon as he said it, I had a knee jerk reaction. Given the technology of the device, a lathe would have been child’s play.

Something like this doesn’t spring fully formed from nothing. I know it’s difficult to put the pieces of material technology together that far back. More interesting info on the ingenuity and applied intellect of the ancient Greeks: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hero_of_Alexandria#Inventions

Want to contact me? Scott M. Haskins 805 570 4140 mobile

Have a wondrous day!

Scott M. Haskins in the lab with WPA murals from the Long Beach Library

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A Section of Santa Barbara Mission Original 1785 Lienzo Mural Restored And On Display

The historical photo of the Lienzo in the main chapel of the Santa Barbara Mission

I’ve posted previously about the exciting research, fundraising and mural conservation efforts for an extremely important and historic element of the main chapel of the Santa Barbara Mission. The 1786 backdrop was designed with architectural features, statues and lots of color enhancing the stone wall at the head of the chapel behind the altar with richness and movement that enhanced the devotional activities, experiences and emotions.  And additional value of this important feature is that it’s colors and design were probably influenced and painted by the indigenous members of the community.

The Lienzo was damaged in earthquakes

Damaged badly in several earthquakes it was finally removed, rolled up and put into storage. Along the way, several attempts were made to restore it but the Lienzo was very brittle and very heavy. It’s understandable that the Padres gave up on its maintenance and restoration given their lack of knowledge in such matters. In fact, the story goes, that a section of the Lienzo was used as a sail for a small boat that sunk in the bay.

So, given that, after mural conservation efforts, it’s use as a full sized Lienzo at the head of the chapel is not possible… and given that it is so fragile and that it is not complete… it was decided to use the remaining sections for display as backdrops in small side chapels and exhibits at the Mission complex.

Actually, I love the idea of some of the sections being used inside chapels behind an altar as this fulfills the purpose for which it was created historically.

The 1st section of the original 1786 Lienzo after painting conservation treatments and installed behind an ancient alter and other artifacts as a side chapel.

The effort of painting conservation included stabilizing lifting paint, re-joining breaks and rips, cleaning, carefully inpainting (limited retouching with reversible paint… we never use oil paint)  and, very important, a backing was applied that allowed the mural to be mounted to the wall and protected against future earthquakes. To see how the mural was reinstalled, click on the link https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_4Bi0-8oZ6M and forward to the 4;30 minute. We are confident that these preservation and restoration treatments will ensure its presence and historical relevance far into the future.

Congratulations to the Mission’s Executive Director, Dr. Monica Orozco and the Friends of the Mission who were responsible for saving such an important part of our history in the community and State of CA. Dr. Orozco has been a champion for ongoing quality preservation and restoration efforts following professional standards of practice.

Fine Art Conservation Laboratories is honored to be part of this historic preservation work.

There are a total of five panels in need of conservation, costing close to $100,000 for the entire project.  If interested in supporting this project, donate today at https://www.santabarbaramission.org/online-donation/ and select the Lienzo Conservation Project in the drop down.

Contributions can also be sent to (and make the check out to) “Old Mission Santa Barbara” at 2201 Laguna Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93103. You may also contribute with a credit card by calling (805) 682-4713.

See more about art conservation efforts at https://www.sbmal.org/conservation

Spanish Colonial Cherub

Questions or media call Scott M. Haskins

805 570 4140 or faclartdoc@gmail.com

 

#SantaBarbaraMission #SpanishColonialArt #ScottMHaskins #FineArtConservationLaboratories #MonicaOrozco #ArtRestoration #ArtConservation #PaintingConservation #PaintingRestoration #MuralRestoration #MuralConservation

Posted in Historic Buildings - Construction Sites, Historic Preservation, In Lab, Murals, Painting on canvas | Tagged | Comments Off on A Section of Santa Barbara Mission Original 1785 Lienzo Mural Restored And On Display

Rediscovering The Important Genius of The Woman Who Broke The Mold of French Fine Art High Society At The End Of The 1880’s, Elisabeth Jerichau-Baumann

Elisabeth Jerichau-Baumann was born in Poland of German parents, who painted in Italy, was adored in France, admitted to the harems of the Ottomans and got away with creating erotic paintings of mermaids. She is considered an important figure in opening up the male dominated French fine art society to women artists at a time of the Salon’s greatest international acclaim.

At the age of nineteen, she was admitted to one of the most important art centres in Europe and was associated with the Düsseldorf school of painting. In 1844 she attracted public attention for the first time and moved to Rome like the rest of the art world. Though she painted in Italy, Baumann had great success abroad, however, and had a special following in France where she was twice represented at the World Fair in Paris, first in 1867 and again in 1878. In 1852 she exhibited some of her paintings in London, and Queen Victoria requested a private presentation in Buckingham Palace.

The Harems of the Ottoman Empire: In 1869–1870 Baumann traveled extensively in the Eastern Mediterranean and Middle-East, and again in 1874–1875 accompanied by her son Harald. She was able to gain access to the harems of the Ottoman Empire and as a result was able to paint scenes of harem life from personal observation, in contrast to most artists of the time, whose work on this popular subject was entirely derived from the imagination or other artists in the same position as themselves. Nevertheless, as Roberts[4] points out, she had to curb her desire to paint the women of the harems as Europeans liked to imagine them because they insisted on being painted in the latest Paris fashions. How funny is that?

A fellah woman with her child, 1872

In 1869, she was admitted into the harem of Mustafa Fazil Paşa. She was entranced by Mustafa Paşa’s daughter Nazlı and wrote home to her husband and children, ‘Yesterday I fell in love with a beautiful Turkish Princess’.

The sensualism in some of these paintings was still considered taboo in some parts of Europe and the Danish art world which tried to keep these works out of sight. She is also known for a series of mermaids that were also by some considered erotic in  quality.

I thought you would like to see an interesting painting by this artist that we have in the art conservation lab right now. The wonderfully high quality painting was painted by Madame Elisabeth Jerichau-Baumann in about 1882. There is a very interesting historical background of intrigue of this artwork.

For several reasons, today it is not the masterpiece that it used to be: perhaps she mixed her colors poorly and as the drying took place, a network of cracking formed that distract the eye and made many details “lose resolution.” But, the painting could have also easily been next to a heat source (fireplace) which could have also caused the network of cracking.

We also have to remember that this panting has been through a couple of revolutions and world wars too, so, there’s that! Its probably been hauled around in hay wagons, traveled internationally on ships and who knows what else.

Previous restoration of the cracking was remedied with a broad brush with little attention to detail nor did it honor the genius and details of the original artist as fine details and colors were obliterated under the fast, easy, cheap method of restoration. When people ask our lab if we can do the restoration job faster and cheaper I show them this photo:

The result of the past restoration work (repainting) was a serious reduction or covering over of the original quality that the painting was known for in “its day.” That quality still exists under all the repainting and is being uncovered through the cleaning and removal of overpaint to re-reveal the original details (including the cracking) which we are doing today in our lab.

Our inpainting of the cracks will be done with a very small brush and will respect the original details and colors of the original artist. The painting is accompanied by its original ornate frame, also being conserved back to its original excellent quality after extensive poor patch work (you can’t even call it restoration its so ugly! ) over the last 140 years.

Another painting but the same model.

But to be precise, we don’t have a tube of oil paint in the lab and none of us are artists. For inpainting, we use pigment/resin mixtures that remain always reversible and don’t discolor. The challenge of “touching up” a painting is a color matching issue (also texture, shine etc). In my 45 years of experience, I’ve never had to reinvent a face. There is nothing creative about what we do. In fact, when I was in college and my art history chairman suggested art conservation to me, he “got me” when he said that it was “the application of science to the preservation of art.”

If you would like to discuss a painting conservation question,

please feel free to call 805 570 4140 or faclofficemanager@gmail.com

Here is more about us: https://www.FineArtConservationLab.com/media-room/

Posted in In Lab, Painting on canvas | Tagged | Comments Off on Rediscovering The Important Genius of The Woman Who Broke The Mold of French Fine Art High Society At The End Of The 1880’s, Elisabeth Jerichau-Baumann